The states regulate the noise created by motor vehicles but not by commercial aircraft.

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xunilxunil

Banned
Urdu
"The states regulate the noise created by motor vehicles but not by commercial aircraft."

How it would be if we want to expand the parallel structure ?

"The states regulate the noise created by motor vehicles but the states don't regulate noise created by commercial aircraft."

or
"The states regulate the noise created by motor vehicles but is not created by commercial aircraft."

or

"The states regulate the noise created by motor vehicles but not the noise created by commercial aircraft."


I just want to know why we use 'not' instead of 'do not'?


Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's known as ellipsis

    el•lip•sis (i lipsis), n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
    1. Grammar
      • Grammar the omission from a sentence or other construction of one or more words that would complete or clarify the construction, as the omission of who are, while I am, or while we are from I like to interview people sitting down.
      • Grammar the omission of one or more items from a construction in order to avoid repeating the identical or equivalent items that are in a preceding or following construction, as the omission of been to Paris from the second clause of I've been to Paris, but they haven't.
    "The states regulate {the noise created by motor vehicles but not the noise created by commercial aircraft.}"
    In some cases, ellipsis can create ambiguity or confusion and then ellipsis is a bad idea.
     
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