The stock market could go down 10% in a breeze

atakeris

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello,

The stock market could go down 10% in a breeze.

Does this idiom make sense here? I want to say that it could go down easily, quickly without using adverbs.
 
  • Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    I've never heard this idiom, but it makes perfect sense to me. I would understand it to mean that any little thing - even just a breeze - could make the stock market fall by this small amount.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To me, 'a breeze' is something that is done easily but not necessarily quickly. It doesn't quite work in your sentence.

    Something like '' . . . go down in a flash/an instant' is more idiomatic.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you mean it can happen easily, then "in a breeze" or "in a light breeze" (a sailing metaphor, I believe) works fine. Like Sparky I find this a little-used metaphor, but one dictionary I consulted online lists its meaning:

    in a breeze

    Easily;handily;without much or any effort.

    If you mean that it can happen very quickly, then "in a flash".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you mean it can happen easily, then "in a breeze" or "in a light breeze" (a sailing metaphor, I believe) works fine. Like Sparky I find this a little-used metaphor, but one dictionary I consulted online lists its meaning:

    in a breeze

    Easily;handily;without much or any effort.

    If you mean that it can happen very quickly, then "in a flash".
    Hey Presto posted while I was still typing. And we agree on that "in a flash" means quickly.

    What are you trying to express?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Even a small breeze could topple the stock market resulting in a drop of 30 to 40 percent."

    "The stock market is like a coin balanced on its edge; the slightest breeze or vibration could make it topple."

    "The stock market it poised like Karl Wallenda on a tightrope: A breeze could undo either."

    (Karl Wallenda was a high wire tightrope walker killed with a stiff breeze knocked him off the rope.)
     
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