The <stock prices> horrified, amused, depressed and outraged me to varying degrees

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divanity

Member
Chinese-China
"After lunch we explored the children’s clothes section, walking floors covered with carpets richer and thicker than minor royals. The stock prices horrified, amused, depressed and outraged me to varying degrees. I looked at my gorgeous little baby in her Penney’s leggings and M&S t-shirt covered in drool and lunch and wondered if I’d failed at life because I couldn’t afford a handwash-only cashmere onesie to cover her perfect skin.
"
I find it difficult to understand the sentence above. I cannot figure out what "the stock prices" refers to. if it refers to the equity prices, it seem to be out of place in the given context. Is it a metaphor used to show the unreasonable prices of the clothes?
 
  • srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I cannot figure out what "the stock prices" refers to.
    From our dictionary for "stock"
    1. a supply of goods kept on hand by a merchant, etc., for sale to customers;
    .....inventory:
    .....a good stock of computers.

    richer and thicker than minor royals.
    Should it be "for minor royals," divanity. Otherwise I don't understand what that means.

    Edit: I looked at the source, and it is as you have written it.
     
    Last edited:

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Carpets richer and thicker than minor royals are meant to be extremely plush ("rich") and thick; rich like minor members of the royal family, and physically thick just as the speaker thinks minor royals are mentally thick ("stupid" in British slang).
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Stock prices" startled me a little at first, before I realised it meant "the prices of the goods for sale". They might have simply written "the prices" and I would have understood immediately.
     
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