The strong man is stronger when is alone.

  • Dission

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish, Spain
    That was great, thank you.

    I don´t actually know any german, but why have you used "ein" instead of "der"? which is the google´s translation (the rest is exactly the same)

    just wondering, thank you.
     

    Henryk

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    That was great, thank you.

    I don´t actually know any german, but why have you used "ein" instead of "der"? which is the google´s translation (the rest is exactly the same)

    just wondering, thank you.
    If you used der, a specific man would be meant. But Kajjo's impression is that you mean men in general. Thus he used the indefinite article.
     

    sgtudor1965

    Member
    English, USA
    Kajjo,
    Would you typically add a "noch", as in "ein starke Mann ist noch staerker... (please forgive the lack of umlauts). Also, why "alleine" and not "allein"?
    Vielen Dank,
    sgtudor1965
     

    Henryk

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    Kajjo,
    Would you typically add a "noch", as in "ein starke Mann ist noch staerker... (please forgive the lack of umlauts). Also, why "alleine" and not "allein"?
    Vielen Dank,
    sgtudor1965
    allein and alleine are the same, but allein is usually used in informal speech. As for noch, it'd have the same meaning as yet in the English sentence.

    Ein starker Mann ist noch stärker, wenn er allein ist.
    The strong man is yet stronger when he's alone.
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    Apart from your English version not being gramatically correct, what are you trying to say with that sentence, Dission?
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    If you used der, a specific man would be meant. But Kajjo's impression is that you mean men in general. Thus he used the indefinite article.
    I could not have expressed it better myself. Thanks, Henryk.

    sgtudor said:
    Kajjo, would you typically add a "noch", as in "ein starke Mann ist noch staerker...
    No, I would not add "noch", because it changes the meaning to: "The strong man is even stronger if he is alone." But yes, you could add "noch" if you want to express this content.

    Kajjo
     

    Acrolect

    Senior Member
    German, Austria
    That was great, thank you.

    I don´t actually know any german, but why have you used "ein" instead of "der"? which is the google´s translation (the rest is exactly the same)

    just wondering, thank you.
    That is something called generic reference - this means that you do not actually refer to a specific individual, but to the whole class in general. In German as in English generic reference can be expressed by a singular noun preceded by a definite or an indefinite article or a plural noun (without any article). So your English sentence would also work with:

    A strong man is stronger when alone
    Strong men are stronger when alone

    So I guess that all the following versions would be (additional) appropriate translations:

    Ein starker Mensch ist alleine noch stärker
    Der starke Mensch ist alleine noch stäker (also possible: Alleine ist der Starke noch stärker) (mind that this does not necessarily refer to a specific human being or man)
    Starke Menschen sind alleine noch stärker (or: Alleine sind starke Menschen noch stärker - that would be my preferred version)
     
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