(the) students are expected to take their turn

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
If it is your turn to do something, you now have the duty, chance, or right to do it, when other people have done it before you or will do it after you.
Students are expected to take their turn leading the study group.
Collins Cobuild

It's talking about a particular study group, but "students" are not determined. That means that, though specific students are implied, "students" doesn't take "the" because they are contrasted with other groups of people (or one man). E.g. - with teachers, rector, etc. Am I right?
Thanks.
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    "Students are expected to take turns... ."

    If the specific study group is known, I would definitely use "the students." Without the article, any group of students could be meant.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Students are expected to take turns... ."

    If the specific study group is known, I would definitely use "the students." Without the article, any group of students could be meant.
    Then I don't understand.:( If we read that someone is "expected to take their turn leading the study group", thus the study group is known/specific, isn't it? Particularly since it takes the definite article...
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I disagree with MQ. "The" is neither required nor useful, provided the meaning is clear from context, and this need not be a "they have been mentioned before" type of context, but can simply be a situational context. The sample sentence given would typically appear in a prospectus describing details of this study group. It means all students who take part in this study group, in the same way a sign at a swimming pool saying "Swimmers must shower before entering the pool" would mean all swimmers who plan to enter the pool.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    The students are expected to take turns...

    Each student is expected to take his or her turn...

    Each of the students is expected to take his or her turn...

    The students are expected to take their turns...

    Hope this clarifies it. The first version would be my preference were I doing this translation.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Oh, I didn't see two last answers.
    I disagree with MQ. "The" is neither required nor useful, provided the meaning is clear from context, and this need not be a "they have been mentioned before" type of context, but can simply be a situational context. The sample sentence given would typically appear in a prospectus describing details of this study group. It means all students who take part in this study group, in the same way a sign at a swimming pool saying "Swimmers must shower before entering the pool" would mean all swimmers who plan to enter the pool.
    That means that the "the" is optional in this sentence, right?
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It depends on context.
    Without the article, it reads like part of an instruction or information sheet presented to the class at the start of the course.
    With the article, it sounds like a comment made by the teacher explaining the procedure to a visitor.
     
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