The test will start <right> at 10 a.m.

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HajiSahib

Banned
Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
University of Engineering and Technology Lahore is going to conduct Entry test on 22nd July 2018 for admission in various Engineering disciplines. The test will start right at 10 am. Reporting time is 9 am.
Reach as soon as possible!

Best of luck!

Someone told me that "right" is incorrect here. But in a recent thread of mine, I've been told that it means "immediately". With that meaning, it makes sense above, i.e., The test will start immediately at 10 am. But why did they say "right" is not correct.

Thanks
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    But in a recent thread of mine, I've been told that it means "immediately".
    And "The test will start immediately at 10 am." would not be correct either.

    The test will start at 10 am precisely.
    The test will start promptly at 10 am.
    The test will start at 10 am on the dot. (idiom - informal - probably BE).
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    And "The test will start immediately at 10 am." would not be correct either.

    The test will start at 10 am precisely.
    The test will start promptly at 10 am.
    The test will start at 10 am on the dot. (idiom - informal - probably BE).
    Thanks, but you didn't tell that why "right" is incorrect here and why "The test will start immediately at 10 am" is incorrect. Can you throw some light?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's a little strange: we should be able to use 'right' to emphasize the preposition. That's common usage. But in this case we don't say it (we do say 'right at the start'), and we can say 'right on 10 a.m.' though we don't usually use 'on' with times.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Right' on its own doesn't mean 'immediately'. Expressions like 'right now' or 'right away' can mean 'immediately', but these won't work in your sentence.

    'Immediately' doesn't work in your sentence either. I suspect you mean 'promptly'.

    But you don't really need anything there. Just 'The test will start at 10 am' is enough.

    What do you mean by 'Reach as soon as possible!'?


    Slowly cross-posted.
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    'Right' on its own doesn't mean 'immediately'. Expressions like 'right now' or 'right away' can mean 'immediately', but these won't work in your sentence.

    'Immediately' doesn't work in your sentence either. I suspect you mean 'promptly'.

    But you don't really need anything there. Just 'The test will start at 10 am' is enough.

    What do you mean by 'Reach as soon as possible!'?


    Slowly cross-posted.
    I don't understand why "right at 10 am" is not correct and also why "immediately" can't work there. Can you please explain sir?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks, but you didn't tell that why "right" is incorrect here
    You sound as if you want "right" to mean "immediately" - and it does not.

    I also suspect that you are trying to translate Hindi directly - you cannot always do this.

    As heypresto pointed out, "right" only means "immediately" when used in context - i.e. in the context of another adverb.
    and why "The test will start immediately at 10 am" is incorrect.
    All actions of starting are immediate. The intransitive form of "to start" is what is known as a punctual verb (as opposed to a durative verb) - there is no duration of time implied in its use. It is therefore pleonastic to say "immediately."
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    Please note what I mean by "right" in my sentence above.
    The test will start right at 10 am. :arrow: this means that the test will start exactly at 10 am. Not at 9:59 am and not at 10:01 am. I mean, at 10 am sharp. Do the following sentences convey this meaning?

    The test will start at 10 am precisely.
    The test will start promptly at 10 am.
    The test will start at 10 am on the dot. (idiom - informal - probably BE).
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I knew exactly what you meant - but you had phrased it wrongly. The sentences I gave all give the meaning that you want.

    "at 10 am sharp." this works too (at least in BE.)
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: 'Precisely', 'promptly', 'on the dot', 'at 10 am sharp' are all perfect here.

    Another informal, (but probably not appropriate here), way to say it is 'at dead on 10 am'.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "Do that right now!" - "Do that immediately!"
    "Can you give me £5 immediately?" - "Can you give me £5 right at this moment?"
    "I hit the target right in the centre." -> I hit the target immediately in the centre." -> in this "immediately" = directly, i.e. not "close to" but exactly upon that point." (See #2 immediately - WordReference.com Dictionary of English)

    You should understand that "right" has many meanings and only the context will tell you which meaning it has.

    Although "right" can mean "immediately" and "correct", it does not mean that you can use either word as a substitute in a particular sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    HajiSahib, I am guessing that the person who told you that "right at 10 a.m." is not correct is a speaker of British English.
    Please note that in American English and, based on the examples I found, in Canadian English,
    The test will start right at 10:00 a.m.
    is perfectly correct.

    Some examples of "right at" + a time:
    "We will start right at 9:00 am with opening remarks and challenges."
    "Please make the appropriate preparations so you can get to your field and get ready to play so we can start right at 9:00 AM."
    "The warm-up will start right at 9:00, the WOD will start right at 9:15..."
    "Now, we try to start right at 9:00, so if you can be here by 8:45 at the latest, it makes things run more smoothly."
    "He figured they didn't start right at 9:00 so he turned toward the Starbucks."
    Above examples and many more can be found here.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    HajiSahib, I am guessing that the person who told you that "right at 10 a.m." is not correct is a speaker of British English.
    Please note that in American English and, based on the examples I found, in Canadian English,
    The test will start right at 10:00 a.m.
    is perfectly correct.
    I agree completely. To me there's nothing remotely strange or wrong about "right at 10 A.M." What is wrong in American English is the use of "on" suggested in a couple of posts above: "right on 10 a.m.; dead on 10 a.m."
     
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