''The time is coming'' Vs ''Almost time''

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

I'd like to know which of the expressions above sounds idiomatic in the context below. Please take a look.


"Jane, I must go there and buy the dress. The wedding is in four days. The time is coming. So, I have to be ready.''

Vs


"Jane, I must go there and buy the dress. The wedding is in four days. It is almost time. So, I have to be ready.''


The time is coming, it is almost time definitions: the time when something will happen is near, something is going to happen very soon.


Thank you in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I think these uses would be typical:

    "The time is coming when we will all be permanently connected to the internet." here "time" is used in the sense of a future era, i.e. a prolonged, but indefinite period.

    "It is almost time to go to bed." Here, "time" means: a particular moment in the future.

    So: "The wedding is in four days. It is almost time." would be suitable.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Almost time" = the time is very near. "The time is coming" = at some unspecified time in the future (perhaps next week, perhaps 500 years from now).
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Parla, Would you use "the time is coming" in the contexts presented in the OP?
    No. "The time is coming when there will be a wedding" = Some day there will probably be a wedding, but who knows when? If the wedding is imminent and I need to buy a dress, then it's almost time. (Actually, we'd probably say, "Time's growing very short." Or, "We're cutting it awfully close.")
     
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