The total amount…you have taken follows…

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
Does this work?

"The total amount of amino acids you have taken follows the kind of amino acid that is the least in amount."

This was intended to mean the balance matters the most, not the total amount of amino acids regardless of type. So the type of amino acid that is the least in amount will decide the effective amino intake.

I wonder if the verb "follow" was used correctly. I think I haven't seen this usage before.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I wonder if the verb "follow" was used correctly.
    To be frank, the sentence is incomprehensible and the explanation does not seem to make much sense. :confused: How does a person know which amino acids they are taking and what the quantity of each is?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    What is the context? Did you write this?

    I read a lot of diet advice and have never seen food talked about in terms of amino acids.
    It sounds like it could be a diet plan in response to some tests (following the results of tests?) The tense seems wrong too. Are you guiding people or reflecting on what has happened (have taken).


    "The total amount of amino acids you have taken follows the kind of amino acid that is the least in amount."

    This was intended to mean the balance matters the most, not the total amount of amino acids regardless of type. So the type of amino acid that is the least in amount will decide the effective amino intake.

    I wonder if the verb "follow" was used correctly. I think I haven't seen this usage before.
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    What is the context? Did you write this?

    I read a lot of diet advice and have never seen food talked about in terms of amino acids.
    It sounds like it could be a diet plan in response to some tests (following the results of tests?) The tense seems wrong too. Are you guiding people or reflecting on what has happened (have taken).

    Yes, this is something I read somewhere else, but it wasn't written in English. I would've brought it as was if it were. Whether this statement is accurate or not, the message itself was that one needs to keep a good balance in their protein intakes. Most of amino acids are synthesized in the body, but a few are not. So you need to take them in pills.

    Back to the OP, my focus was what verb can replace the improperly used verb "follow" in that context. It supposedly meant tyo lead other factors and serve as a key factor. If one type of amino acid is 3 and others are 10, you wouldn't benefit as much as 10, but 3.

    To be frank, the sentence is incomprehensible and the explanation does not seem to make much sense. :confused: How does a person know which amino acids they are taking and what the quantity of each is?

    I don't understand how a person can target a certain type of amino acid and focus on the balance in their intakes. What caught my attention was just how it can be described in English.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I understand the idea.

    Basically, if you can combine 2 units of A with one unit of B to get one of C, then if you have 5 units of B, anything more than 10 units of A is useless. Anything above that will have nothing to combine with. B is the limiting factor.

    But how to say that smoothly?
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I understand the idea.

    Basically, if you can combine 2 units of A with one unit of B to get one of C, then if you have 5 units of B, anything more than 10 units of A is useless. Anything above that will have nothing to combine with. B is the limiting factor.

    But how to say that smoothly?

    Yes, that's exactly what I was looking for.

    To me, your input seems already refined. I was looking for a verb and that's where this grilling of everyone came from. Breaking down the construction and separate it out as a noun (the limiting factor) seems fancy.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    "The total amount of amino acids you have taken follows the kind of amino acid that is the least in amount."

    We have to try and tease out the meaning in order to comment on the use of the verb. First impression is that this is unusual, as you thought yourself.

    Looking at it again, with a bit more information about what they might be trying to communicate, I would say the author might be thinging of the phrase "follows on from".
    The total amount of amino acid X that I took followed on from the fact that I was deficient in AAX.


    The verb follows is not the only puzzling thing here, because when you are ingesting something the amount is SET before you eat it. So how are the tensese working here? Why "you have taken" and "follows"?


    Here's some effort that sounds a bit more natural to me:
    I need to eat 20g of amino acid X because that's the one I am most short of.
    The total amount of amino acids you need to take will be determined by the amino acid you are most deficient in.
    ---------------

    There are lots of ways we can play with these words, but lacking absolute clarity about the purpose we can't be sure that we are glossing accurately.

    I am not sure that my ideas make sense in terms of science either, never mind the language angle.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I understand the idea.

    Basically, if you can combine 2 units of A with one unit of B to get one of C, then if you have 5 units of B, anything more than 10 units of A is useless. Anything above that will have nothing to combine with. B is the limiting factor.

    But how to say that smoothly?
    I had missed this idea.

    Maybe the bit that needs changing is "you have used" rather than taken? And maybe "dictated" is better than "follows"?
    e.g.
    The amount of AAX you have used is dictated by the deficiency in your body.
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The amount of AAX you have used is dictated by the deficiency in your body.
    I suppose "dictate" does work very nicely here.

    If there's anyone should be held to how unclear this question can be, it should be me.

    I tried to convey the original I read as close, but it seems to have caused more confusion.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It's always a challenge with a small extract, maybe if you have given us more surrounding text we could have grasped it better.

    There is still a strong chance that this is not a great sentence either in terms of the science or language used!
     
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