The tragedy ended the life of hundred of souls.

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Nesa_nesa234

Senior Member
Spanish
Does this sentence make any sense?
The tragedy ended the life of hundred of souls?
Because someone told me that a soul is nos alive and that's right but it still makes sense to me.
Before I had written it like this "the tragedy ended hundred of souls' lives. But my teacher told me it was wrong and I thought of rephrasing it as above "ended the life of hundred of souls".
What do you think?
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A soul (now old-fashioned/poetic) = a person.
    Does this sentence make any sense?
    The tragedy ended the life of hundred of souls?
    No
    Before I had written it like this "the tragedy ended hundred of souls' lives.
    That does not work.
    But my teacher told me it was wrong and I thought of rephrasing it as above "ended the life of hundred of souls".
    That does not work either
    "ended the life of hundreds of souls". :tick: But as I say, this is old-fashioned/poetic.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In some contexts, the people aboard a ship or an airplane are sometimes referred to as "souls". There are 18 souls on board. The ship was lost with all souls.
    You can use it outside of those cases but it sounds literary or, as PaulQ says, old-fashioned.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    While "soul" can in some situations be used to mean "person" (although I would not recommend it in modern English), they are not the same. People die, but souls are supposedly immortal, so anything referring to the death of a soul sounds very odd indeed.
     
    Yes, it is still common for airlines and ships to refer to people as "souls." It is meant to refer to everyone on board vs. specifically passengers or crew. That said, outside of these scenarios, use of the word "souls" in writing is more of a poetic device.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it is still common for airlines and ships to refer to people as "souls." It is meant to refer to everyone on board vs. specifically passengers or crew. That said, outside of these scenarios, use of the word "souls" in writing is more of a poetic device.
    I have never noticed that usage (air and sea accidents are not reported in the British press using "souls", so far as I am aware). Is it ever used for deaths, though?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Like others, "souls" does not work for me. "Lives" does.

    One hundred lives were tragically lost yesterday in an accident involving...
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    To stress a point made above by PaulQ, regardless of whether one is speaking of souls, or persons, or pots and pans, the construction "hundred of" is wrong -- the word naming the quantity must be in the plural:

    Hundred of souls were lost in the fire:cross:
    Hundreds of souls were lost in the fire :tick:

    Thousand of students were helped by the new policy.:cross:
    Thousands of students were helped by the new policy.:tick:

    Imelda owns dozen of pairs of expensive shoes.:cross:
    Imelda owns dozens of pairs of expensive shoes.:tick:
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Imelda owns dozen of pairs of expensive shoes.:cross:
    Imelda owns dozens thousands of pairs of expensive shoes.:tick:
    Numerical correction. It was initially reported to be either 3,000 or 7,500 pairs, though the final tally was put at 1,016 pairs.
     
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