The tram is always no-show.

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,

If I want to say that a tram doesn't show up on a frequent basis, can I use "no-show" to describe it and say:

The tram is always no-show.

Many thanks!
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    A no-show refers to not showing up at all, as opposed to being late. Is that what you mean?

    I'd say:
    Trams often don't turn up at this time.
    Trams often don't run at this time.


    There are various other ways of saying it. But I wouldn't use "always no-show".
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    A no-show refers to not showing up at all, as opposed to being late. Is that what you mean?

    I'd say:
    Trams often don't turn up at this time.
    Trams often don't run at this time.


    There are various other ways of saying it. But I wouldn't use "always no-show".
    Thanks. :)

    I do mean not showing up at all. Is it possible to use "no-show" in this context to describe trams?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I suppose you could say "The tram is a no-show".
    But "...is always no-show", without an article, making "no-show" an adjective, doesn't work however.

    I find it a little unusual to hear "no-show" being used for a tram. Others might have a different opinion.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    If I want to say that a tram doesn't show up on a frequent basis, can I use "no-show" to describe it
    No. A late tram is not a "no-show".

    A teacher who misses a class is a "no-show".
    A performer who misses their concert is a "no-show".
    If an event does not happen because the event's leader did not go there, that person is a "no-show".

    A "no-show" is a person who did not show up, where they were supposed to be,
     
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