the two-story lodge <that><which> once housed...

raymondaliasapollyon

Senior Member
Chinese
I am wondering whether the restrictive relative pronoun that or the non-restrictive relative pronoun which (plus a comma) should be used to modify the Hunting Lodge in the following:

Casa Loma consists of three main buildings — the Casa Loma proper, which is a seven-story Gothic tower, the two-story Hunting Lodge that once housed the home’s servants quarters, and a massive stable.

I'd appreciate your help.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Casa Loma consists of three main buildings — the Casa Loma proper, which is a seven-story Gothic tower, the two-story Hunting Lodge that once housed the home’s servants quarters, and a massive stable.
    That, without a comma, is fine, but you have other punctuation problems, including the Oxford comma.

    Try: Casa Loma consists of three main buildings — the Casa Loma proper, which is a seven-story Gothic tower; the two-story Hunting Lodge hunting lodge that once housed the home’s servants quarters and a massive stable.

    You could make the hunting lodge, which is not a proper noun, a non-restrictive clause if you like, however.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    That, without a comma, is fine, but you have other punctuation problems, including the Oxford comma.

    Try: Casa Loma consists of three main buildings — the Casa Loma proper, which is a seven-story Gothic tower; the two-story Hunting Lodge hunting lodge that once housed the home’s servants quarters and a massive stable.

    You could make the hunting lodge, which is not a proper noun, a non-restrictive clause if you like, however.
    It seems "the Hunting Lodge" is standardly capitalized, just like the United States.
    If so, is "which" plus a comma a more sensible choice?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    t seems "the Hunting Lodge" is standardly capitalized, just like the United States.
    Certainly not unless that's the formal name of the structure, which wold be strange and does not seem to be the case here.
    You are free, however, to believe whatever you like.
    As a side note, "standardly" is not an English word.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Certainly not unless that's the formal name of the structure, which wold be strange and does not seem to be the case here.
    You are free, however, to believe whatever you like.
    As a side note, "standardly" is not an English word.
    But what if "the Hunting Lodge" is a name like "the United States"?
    In that case, would "that" still make sense?
     
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