the unity of the individual / <the?> populations of all ages

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HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
I've been wondering for the last hour why one has 'the' and the other doesn't even though they are constructed in the same manner, 'noun of noun': 'the unity of the individual' and 'population of all ages'??? What do you think makes the difference?

A Primer of Adlerian Psychology offers an accessible, yet very learned, introduction to Adlerian Psychology. Also known as Individual Psychology, the approach stresses the unity of the individual, the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life. Therapists can apply this theory in a variety of settings with populations of all ages, making it a highly practical and valuable approach. Written by two scholars with extensive knowledge and experience in this school of thought, this book covers the basic tenets of Individual Psychology geared toward those students and clinicians who are yet unfamiliar with Adler's work.
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Isn't it simply because of the plural?

    Therapists can apply this theory in a variety of settings with the population of all the age

    (?)
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi, Biffo. This query may be tangential, but you say 'all the age,' not 'all the ages'?
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    (i) the unity of the individual
    (ii) populations of all ages

    My speculation for now is both parts introduce 'unity' and 'population' to the explanation, or to the readers for that matter (hence, you would go without 'the') but since the 'unity' is an inevitable existence for the individual, it brings on 'the.' Does this make sense?
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, HSS :) and thank you for the PM.

    My impression is simply that "populations of all ages" is an indefinite NP (= Ø [populations of all ages]), similar to the one you'd have in "Ø people from all walks of life were present at the ceremony". On the other hand, "the unity of the individual" is a definite NP (hence "THE unity of the individual").
    One might of course refer to "unity of the individual" in an indefinite manner and say, for instance "Ø Unity of the individual is achieved through ...".

    GS :)

    @ Biffo. "The population (s?) of all the (?) age (s?)". This is rather strange, don't you agree?
     
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    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hullo, HSS :) and thank you for the PM.

    My impression is simply that "populations of all ages" is an indefinite NP (= Ø [populations of all ages]), similar to the one you'd have in "Ø people from all walks of life were present at the ceremony". On the other hand, "the unity of the individual" is a definite NP (hence "THE unity of the individual").
    One might of course refer to "unity of the individual" in an indefinite manner and say, for instance "Ø Unity of the individual is achieved through ...".

    GS :)
    Hi, Giorgio. Good to hear from you, and how have you been?

    What's annoying me is I just can't grasp what covert or overt element of the sentences makes them an indefinite NP or a definite one:). It's a total mystery. My tentative and unsatisfying understanding is that while when the noun following 'of' (the individual) is a patient of a noun (unity) that is derivative of an action verb (unite), 'the' is optional (and is used here although ' ... unity of the individual' is just introduced here), other non-count nouns with 'of' take 'the.'

    eg)
    Ignorance of the conditions of the slum is no excuse. The ignorance of the conditions of the slum is no excuse. (ignorance <<< ignore, 'ignore the conditions')

    The happiness of millions of people depends on the decision of the President. (happiness <<< no verb)

    With 'populations of all ages,' 'population' is a count noun, and the idea is introduced there; hence, it doesn't come up with 'the.' If it were a non-count noun it could be with 'the' although it were introduced there.

    Thanks, GS!
    Hiro:)
     
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    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, Hiro.

    Life is treating me reasonably well, thank you.

    As for the articles, I noticed that in your OP you mention "populationØ of all ages" while in the primer the author mentions "populations of all ages".
    Apart from that, I'd say that if we change the NP's a little, like this, say "The importance of the individual, the subjective choices ... ... . Therapists can apply this theory to/with people of all ages." the treatment of both NP's seems to me to be correct and "logical".

    All the very best :)

    GS :)
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    I just noticed the difference between the two examples below. Both are new, or introduced, ideas in the readings --- populations of all ages, the same --- but the existence of the second is well assumed: it is taken for granted that 'populations of all ages' come to the van while the first is a totally new idea into the reading. Introduced ideas, except for some cases, normally do not come along with 'the.' But people know what referent the author is looking at in the second, so it gets 'the.'

    A Primer of Adlerian Psychology offers an accessible, yet very learned, introduction to Adlerian Psychology. Also known as Individual Psychology, the approach stresses the unity of the individual, the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life. Therapists can apply this theory in a variety of settings with populations of all ages, making it a highly practical and valuable approach. Written by two scholars with extensive knowledge and experience in this school of thought, this book covers the basic tenets of Individual Psychology geared toward those students and clinicians who are yet unfamiliar with Adler's work. (book introduction)
    The volunteers provide support to the public visiting the Blum Family Resource Center Van; encourage the public to board the van to obtain cancer information and services; work to empower the public with current and reliable cancer prevention, early detection and awareness information; and assist the van driver/health educator and other staff to run an efficient and smooth operation at all van events (health fairs, faith based communities, schools, non-profits, corporations, etc.).

    Essential Skills Needed


    Volunteers demonstrate respect, awareness, sensitivity and support for diverse community initiatives and the populations of all ages that are being served. (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute)
     
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    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, Hiro.

    The "first mention vs. second mention" rule , albeit a powerful rule, has exceptions — as usually happens in natural languages:

    "At that point in came the gardener, a man of about forty..."

    As for the two chunks above, I notice that the first NP can hardly be compared with the second: the latter, containing a relative clause, is much more strongly defined than the former: THE populations THAT ARE BEING SERVED. In other words, the Noun "populations" is defined by the complex discontinuous determiner THE ... THAT ARE BEING SERVED. In this case the definite article cannot be dispensed with.

    Best :)

    GS
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As I see it:
    A Primer of Adlerian Psychology offers an accessible, yet very learned, introduction to Adlerian Psychology. Also known as Individual Psychology, the approach stresses the unity of the individual, = A specific unity and [each] specific individual [or the class of individuals[1]],

    hence ‘the’ the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life. Therapists can apply this theory in a variety of settings with populations of all ages, -> population is plural and non-specific = any populations; ages is plural and non-specific = any ages

    [1] Compare: "The cat is a domestic animal." where the cat = the class of cats.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    As I see it:
    A Primer of Adlerian Psychology offers an accessible, yet very learned, introduction to Adlerian Psychology. Also known as Individual Psychology, the approach stresses the unity of the individual, = A specific unity and [each] specific individual [or the class of individuals[1]],

    hence ‘the’ the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life. Therapists can apply this theory in a variety of settings with populations of all ages, -> population is plural and non-specific = any populations; ages is plural and non-specific = any ages

    [1] Compare: "The cat is a domestic animal." where the cat = the class of cats.
    Just wondering, Paul, when you read this paragraph, do you regard 'unity' as something that exists intangibly, or action --- uniting the elements of the individual?

    Hiro
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    You're comparing "the unity of the invidividual" with "populations of all ages," and are wondering why they don't have the same form. If we gave them the same form, we'd have:

    (i) "the unity of the individual" / "the population of the age"

    (ii) "unities of all individuals" / "populations of all ages"

    From this, I'd say the corresponding concepts - unity vs. population, and individual vs. age - are sufficiently different that we cannot expect an analogy.

    Looking at the transformed versions, I'd say that "the population of the age" is nonsense.

    As to "unities of all individuals," usage tells us that "unity" is not normally pluralized in the sense of "harmony or concord," if that is indeed what "unity" stands for here. Therefore we can only expect it to be in the singular. If we have "unity" in the singular, the noun "individual" has to be in the singular too.

    Here, we could discuss which form of the singular would be the most appropriate: "unity," "a unity," or "the unity." I think we can discard "a unity" directly as it doesn't fit the context at all.

    The other two - "unity of the individual" and "the unity of the individual" - are both possible candidates, in my view.

    However, parallelism suggests we use "the unity of the individual" since the next two items in the list begin with the definite article: "the unity of the individual, the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Just wondering, Paul, when you read this paragraph, do you regard 'unity' as something that exists intangibly, or action --- uniting the elements of the individual? Hiro
    Unity is a concept, it does not exist "of itself." It must attach to a concrete object in order to have meaning. In this case, the concrete object is "population".
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    The other two - "unity of the individual" and "the unity of the individual" - are both possible candidates, in my view.

    However, parallelism suggests we use "the unity of the individual" since the next two items in the list begin with the definite article: "the unity of the individual, the subjective choices he or she makes and the goals the individual works towards as he or she moves through life."
    Hi, EStjarn.

    In my view, nouns that are derived from action verbs take 'the' and 'Ø,' and the instances of the same noun don't make too much difference. Here 'unity' is derived from 'unite,' and that it takes 'the' and 'Ø.' And the author went along with 'parallelism,' as you said.

    - It is powered by solar energy, and includes a battery for those days which are cloudy, so purification of the water can happen all year round, hassle-free. (source) >>> Here I think 'the purification of the water' is possible.

    Hiro
     
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