The verb "pass"

RomanPinsEveryone

Senior Member
Spanish, Chinese
I've been passing time watching trains go by. ( pass + time + ving )

The above sentence is related to time. But can you make another sentence without writing about time?

I mean, could the structure be [ pass + money/things/stuff + ving ] ??

Thank you ! and sorry about my poor English !
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    It depends on the word that's used. If you have a specific word and sentence in mind, we can tell you whether "pass" can be used with it in that structure or not.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'm afraid this forum doesn't work that way. We aren't supposed to provide you lists of possible sentences. If you have a question, you need to provide the example and context.
     

    RomanPinsEveryone

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Chinese
    I'm afraid this forum doesn't work that way. We aren't supposed to provide you lists of possible sentences. If you have a question, you need to provide the example and context.
    He passed the salt using his cellphone.

    Is it wrong ?

    I want "pass the salt" and "use his cellphone " to take place at the same time.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's unbelievable. It has no connection with "passing time". Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody using his mobile phone. :confused:

    When you pass time watching trains, you are not giving time to anybody. You are letting time go by (pass).
     

    RomanPinsEveryone

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Chinese
    It's unbelievable. It has no connection with "passing time". Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody using his mobile phone. :confused:
    You mean the sentence means he gave the salt to somebody who was using their mobile phone.

    That, unfortunately, is not what you wrote. Your sentence means someone used their phone to pass the salt to someone else.
    That means the preposition "by" is omitted.

    He passed the salt (by) using his cellphone.

    I've been passing time (by) watching trains go by.

    right?
     
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    RomanPinsEveryone

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Chinese
    Then " He passed the salt using his cellphone. " , isn't this sentence a bit strange ?

    I mean Andygc has different understanding to this sentence.

    Maybe it's a subjective question ?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    He passed the salt (by) using his cellphone.

    I've been passing time (by) watching trains go by.
    It is not a "subjective question." As Andygc said, you can't use a completely different meaning of the word "pass" and construct the same type of sentence with it.

    To pass the salt =- to hand or slide the salt shaker to someone.
    To pass time = to spend time

    If you say "He passed the salt using his cell phone," it is definitely "a bit strange." It can only mean that he pushed the salt shaker along the table with his phone, or set the salt shaker on his phone and handed it to the person.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Then " He passed the salt using his cellphone. " , isn't this sentence a bit strange ?

    I mean Andygc has different understanding to this sentence.

    Maybe it's a subjective question ?
    No, it isn't subjective. Andy and I said exactly the same thing:
    Yes, but only because nobody passes salt using their cellphone...... why on earth would anybody do that?:)
    It's unbelievable. It has no connection with "passing time". Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody using his mobile phone. :confused:

    When you pass time watching trains, you are not giving time to anybody. You are letting time go by (pass).
    That, unfortunately, is not what you wrote. Your sentence means someone used their phone to pass the salt to someone else.
    No it doesn't. You could say 'He passed the salt while using his cellphone', however.
     

    RomanPinsEveryone

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Chinese
    But Andy said
    Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody using his mobile phone.
    Doesn't he mean Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody who was using their mobile phone.

    Or, he means Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody while he was using his mobile phone.

    I'm sorry to make the question confused.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Andy's sentence 'Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody using his mobile phone' means that someone used their cellphone as a way of passing the salt to someone else. That's ridiculous.;)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Doesn't he mean Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody who was using their mobile phone.
    No.
    Or, he means Your sentence means he gave the salt to somebody while he was using his mobile phone.
    No.

    He means what london calling and I have already told you: that your sentence means the person used his mobile phone as an implement to pass someone the salt.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Pass" has many different meanings. The WordReference dictionary page for "pass" (pass - WordReference.com Dictionary of English) shows 3 lists of meanings, copied from 3 on-line dictionaries.

    "Pass the salt" uses meaning 17 in the second list: it means "to hand a salt container from one person to another". How do you pass salt? By using your hand.

    "Pass the time" uses meaning 13 in the second list: it means "to do something while time is passing". How do you pass time? By doing something interesting.

    You can find these definitions by searching the page for examples "pass the salt" and "pass the time"
     
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    RomanPinsEveryone

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Chinese
    I think I got it.

    But, "He passed the salt by using his cellphone." is this the same meaning as "He passed the salt using his cellphone." ??

    Or is this a grammar error?

     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The context of someone using his cell phone to pass the salt is so constrained that it's almost not worth discussing, but yes, I would say your two sentences in #19 both have that meaning.

    As is commonly pointed out in this forum, it is quite easy to construct a grammatically correct sentence that makes no sense or would never be used in real life.
     
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