the way that or how

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  • zazap

    Senior Member
    Canada, French and English
    I would say the 2 options here are "that", or nothing at all
    That's the way that I make my dream come true
    or
    That's the way I make my dream come true (I prefer this option)

    If you want to use "how":
    That's how I make my dream come true
     
    I would say the 2 options here are "that", or nothing at all
    That's the way that I make my dream come true
    or
    That's the way () I make my dream come true (I prefer this option)

    If you want to use "how":
    That's how I make my dream come true

    What I am concerned here is, why "that" can be omitted in the second bolded sentence? Could you tell me why?
    Or,
    If the "that" is omitted, what's relation beween the following two senences? How are they joined?
    1. That's the way
    2. I make my dream come true

    (Maybe it's a silly quesion, but I still hope there is someone who would help me.)


    Many thanks!
     

    marcin k

    Senior Member
    Poland, polish
    That's the way = That's how

    The above explains why you can't say:

    That's the way how.... - that would mean:
    That's how how ...
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    That's the way that I make my dream come true or That's the way () I make my dream come true [...] What I am concerned here is, why "that" can be omitted in the second bolded sentence? Could you tell me why?
    The omission of that is possible because it does not produce ambiguity in the interpretation of the sentence. The word that has different functions. In this case, I'd say it's a conjunction that joins a subordinate clause to a noun. According to the grammar, the conjunction that can often be left out, especially in an informal style (Michael Swan, 2005).

    If the "that" is omitted, what's relation beween the following two senences? How are they joined? 1. That's the way 2. I make my dream come true
    I'd say those sentences are still "joined" by the conjunction that, as if it was still there. The omission of a word or phrase necessary for a complete syntactical construction but not for understanding is called ellipsis.
     
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