The weather was very cold, consequently/nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
The weather was very cold, ………, we decided to go mountain climbing.
a)consequently
b)in addition
c)nevertheless (Answer Key)
d)otherwise
Source: school exam

Hi,
As you know "consequently" usually means "because of that".
So, I think A can also work in the above question. Can't it?


Thank you.
 
  • Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Answer A is perfectly grammatical. The problem with these multiple choice questions is that they often are asking multiple things at the same time, some of which have nothing to do with language.

    As you say, "consequently" usually means "because of that;" consequently, if you chose answer A, you'd be saying, "We decided to go mountain climbing because it was cold." The question writer expected you to assume that people do not like to go mountain climbing when it's cold, or that they wouldn't choose to go climbing specifically because it was cold. They probably expected you to think mountain climbing happens outside and people like to be outside when it's warm - therefore, people like to go mountain climbing when it's warm, not when it's cold. However, there are types of mountain climbing (like ice-climbing) where the threat of melting snow and ice makes the climb much more dangerous. In this context, it would make perfect sense to say "We decided to go climbing because it was cold."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "A" could be grammatically correct, yes. In fact, I could come up with a perfect context where "b" would work too. But in the given context, which is "school exam", only "c" makes sense:)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The blank needs a conjunction and/or a change in punctuation. As it stands, putting "nevertheless" between the two commas in the OP is incorrect. It is two statements not joined by a conjunction. Change the first comma to a semi-colon or a period and it will be correct.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    putting "nevertheless" between the two commas in the OP is incorrect.
    Thanks for answering but now that I see dictionary examples for "nevertheless", I see that it's often used between two commas. Why do you reject this?

    Look at this sentence:

    1. What you said was true. It was, nevertheless, a little unkind.

    I will be grateful if you clarify what you said.

    Thank you.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks for answering but now that I see dictionary examples for "nevertheless", I see that it's often used between two commas. Why do you reject this?

    Look at this sentence:

    1. What you said was true. It was, nevertheless, a little unkind.

    I will be grateful if you clarify what you said.

    Thank you.
    That example is correct - it is between two commas as a parenthetical adverb.
    In the OP it is not only between two commas but it is the only word between two statements and it is not a conjunction. A conjunction is needed in the OP but not in your new example.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Well, to be pedantic... there is no correct answer, because of the comma after "cold". There should be a semicolon or a period (full stop) instead of a comma.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The blank needs a conjunction and/or a change in punctuation. As it stands, putting "nevertheless" between the two commas in the OP is incorrect. It is two statements not joined by a conjunction. Change the first comma to a semi-colon or a period and it will be correct.
    Well, to be pedantic... there is no correct answer, because of the comma after "cold". There should be a semicolon or a period (full stop) instead of a comma.
    It must be true - we agree:)
    Cross-posted with Loob - it's been said three times now, so that clinches it:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm sorry I joined the party late - yes, you were right in posts 8 & 10, Julian!:D
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I agree with the initial post - before reading this thread, I would have said A) was the best answer, because my understanding was that mountain climbing was safer when very cold because of the ice/avalanche issue with melting that Juhasz mentions.

    And normally I'm very good at test-taking. This is a good example of the argument that many tests have skewed their results by requiring cultural knowledge that the tests are not meant to measure.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree with the initial post - before reading this thread, I would have said A) was the best answer, because my understanding was that mountain climbing was safer when very cold because of the ice/avalanche issue with melting that Juhasz mentions.

    And normally I'm very good at test-taking. This is a good example of the argument that many tests have skewed their results by requiring cultural knowledge that the tests are not meant to measure.
    Consequently and nevertheless both work equally well grammatically (if the punctuation is changed) - and, for some, equally logically. I agree that many tests are skewed/screwed by such non-grammar-related aspects not realized by the test-setter(s) - there have been a few threads created as a result of such tests:(.
     

    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    The weather was very cold, nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing. (OP)
    What you said was true. It was, nevertheless, a little unkind. ('That example')
    That example is correct - it is between two commas as a parenthetical adverb.
    In the OP it is not only between two commas but it is the only word between two statements and it is not a conjunction. A conjunction is needed in the OP but not in your new example.
    Could you please rephrase this comparison, I don't get it. Thank you.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If we consider the adverb between commas to be parenthetical/optional and omit it you will see the following:

    The weather was very cold
    , nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:cross: Two main clauses/statements need a conjunction, not a parenthetical adverb.

    It was, nevertheless, a little unkind.:tick: One main clause/statement. Does not need a conjunction and parenthetical adverb is fine.

    The weather was very cold. Nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:tick: Two separate sentences. The second begins with a parenthetical adverb.
    The weather was very cold; nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:tick: Two separate sentences separated by a semi-colon.
    The weather was very cold but we decided, nevertheless, to go mountain climbing.:tick: One sentence - two independent clauses (main clauses) joined by a conjunction with a parenthetical adverb thrown in:)
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    If we consider the adverb between commas to be parenthetical/optional and omit it you will see the following:

    The weather was very cold
    , nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:cross: Two main clauses/statements need a conjunction, not a parenthetical adverb.

    It was, nevertheless, a little unkind.:tick: One main clause/statement. Does not need a conjunction and parenthetical adverb is fine.

    The weather was very cold. Nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:tick: Two separate sentences. The second begins with a parenthetical adverb.
    The weather was very cold; nevertheless, we decided to go mountain climbing.:tick: Two separate sentences separated by a semi-colon.
    The weather was very cold but we decided, nevertheless, to go mountain climbing.:tick: One sentence - two independent clauses (main clauses) joined by a conjunction with a parenthetical adverb thrown in:)
    A wonderful guidance. I was looking for this. Thank you so much.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you prefer to climb mountains in very cold weather, (a) would be correct - but most people don't.

    Cross-posted with Juhasz.
    I agree, that in most cases "nevertheless" is the preferred answer; in some cases however, "consequently" makes more sense.

    The weather was very cold consequently we decided to climb as there was a sheer wall that required ice climbing and warm weather would have made that treacherous.

    I've been on climbs where the first 12,000 feet of ascent have been snow and ice free, but at about 14,000 feet crampons are required (ice prongs on your boots). Some sections can be treacherous to climb as the ice thaws. But this would be a specific exception to the rule. Most climbers do not relish harsh weather.


    Below this climber appears to be climbing a waterfall. In warmer weather this can be very dangerous.

     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    :thumbsup: for the logic.
    Just to keep the grammar lesson intact for our learners I adjusted the punctuation:)
    I thank you for that.

    My emails at work carry this disclaimer:D, unfortunately it is too long for our signature here.

    This email is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I thank you for that.

    My emails at work carry this disclaimer:D, unfortunately it is too long for our signature here.

    This email is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.
    I like the disclaimer:) I would say that about 1/3 of my posts are edited within minutes of posting yet still "variations in natural wood grain" do seem to get through:)
     
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