The World Is Out Here!

Grefsen

Senior Member
English - United States
I have two Russian students, Svetlana and Tatiana, who are addicted to their mobile phones. Yesterday during our evening break most of the students walked with me to the beach to watch the sunset. At one point while we were enjoying the beautiful sunset and the ocean, Svetlana and Tatiana both put their heads down and I took a picture of them while they were using their mobile phones. :)

I want to send them a copy of this picture and write "Hello Svetlana and Tatiana, the world is out here!"

Would the following be correct:

Привет Светлана и Татьяна, Мир здесь!

Заранее спасибо!
 
  • CKM367

    Senior Member
    Russian
    What did you mean as you wrote "out here", not just "here"? And why did you wrote Мир with capital whereas you did not used it in English "world"?
     

    Grefsen

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    What did you mean as you wrote "out here", not just "here"? And why did you wrote Мир with capital whereas you did not used it in English "world"?
    "The world is out here" is an expression sometimes used in English to remind others that they are missing out on what is actually happening in the real "outside" world while they are spending too much time with their face down looking at their smart phone. ;)
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    There's no direct equivalent of this idiomatic expression in Russian, though a non-idiomatic translation can be found, but with a necessarily divergent meaning. One way I can think of is to mention they're missing something universal:

    "Земля без вас крутится!/жизнь пропу́стите!" "the Earth is rolling without you!/don't miss your life!"

    As for your attempt, if they understand it at all, it's through their knowledge of English and a bit of figuring out. This kind of sentence sounds like a matter-of-fact statement, and to make it expressive in Russian you need to add some emphatic particles, for example -то, ведь, же. Still, the idiomatic meaning that you're looking for is missing from the Russian phrase: modern Russian tends to be more straight-forward and doesn't really like idiomatic expressions (those are a feature of folksy Russian).
     
    Last edited:

    esperansa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I want to send them a copy of this picture and write "Hello Svetlana and Tatiana, the world is out here!"

    Would the following be correct:

    Привет Светлана и Татьяна, Мир здесь!
    I think they probably will not get it right when they look at that picture displaying them with their phones. In response they can write, "Отвянь, Хрыч" (Otvyan Khrych).

    Therefore, to avoid misunderstanding, I recommend the phrases proposed by Sobakus or my own variants:
    оглянитесь, жизнь вокруг вас (without using Привет, Светлана и Татьяна, because they will understand that the picture is intended for them, not for Vasiliy or Kharlampiy).
    жизнь проходит мимо вас
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    оглянитесь, жизнь вокруг вас (without using Привет, Светлана и Татьяна, because they will understand that the picture is intended for them, not for Vasiliy or Kharlampiy).
    жизнь проходит мимо вас
    I would just sign it: "ЖИЗНЬ ПРОХОДИТ МИМО" in all capital letters.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    I think the address is required to keep the tone appropriate, given that Grefsen is their teacher. For the same reason, using all caps would be out of place. That said, "жизнь проходит мимо" sounds like a good option if you want something less jocular than what I suggested.
     

    Soroka

    Member
    USA
    Russian
    Я бы сказала: "Девочки, в то время, когда вы смотрите на ваши телефоны, жизнь проходит мимо вас".
     
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