"Their conclusions"

Sextus

Senior Member
Spanish
"Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments propounded by others who believe in their conclusions".

Is it clear that "their conclusions" means "the conclusions of these arguments"?
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It takes careful reading to arrive at the meaning you intend.
    A casual reader (that's me) assumes that "others who believe in their conclusions" means "others who believe in their own conclusions."
    In other words, I read "their" as referring to "others", not to "arguments".

    However, others with more intellectual power, and who have been following the argument thus far, and who delight in personifying arguments, may be able to accommodate the stretch from "arguments" to "their" and make the connection.

    Errrr ... I mean more or less the same as what Loob wrote in three succinct words.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sextus, you've given us two completely different sentences. What do you want to say? What do you want your sentence to mean? What is your question?

    And don't forget, we don't do proofreading...:)
     

    Sextus

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sextus, you've given us two completely different sentences. What do you want to say? What do you want your sentence to mean? What is your question?

    And don't forget, we don't do proofreading...:)
    Is this proofreading? If that's the way you see it...
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    2. "Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments propounded by others who believe in their conclusions".

    1. Is it clear that "their conclusions" means "the conclusions of these arguments"?
    1. No.

    2. We don't do proofreading, which you have not requested. This reader sometimes tries to paraphrase dense, convoluted, and otherwise potentially confusing text for his own amusement. What an author does with such a paraphrase, other than suffer a wounded ego, or a mild bout of rage, is not the responsibility of WordReference Forums, it's lackeys, or the editorial board of The New Sceptic Institute for World Peace and Fence-sitting.

    Here's how I read it, before Loob and panj clarified things for me- This will be a stream of consciousness record of what came to me bit by bit, and not what I finally figured out after reading it twice more.

    Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, Though he gives a few different explanations for all things being neither good nor bad... he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments he takes no responsibility for any of those explanations... propounded by others who believe in their conclusions. He makes clear that they belong to other people, who believe in their own conclusions? or who believe in the conclusions of their own explanations?

    It got a little murky towards the end.

     

    Sextus

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    :D You never miss the opportunity to tease me about my "skepticism" and my style of writing...

    Well, the "others" believe in the conclusions which the arguments purport to establish. Now, to make this clear, I should say: "Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments propounded by others who believe in the conclusions of these arguments". But to avoid using "arguments" three times, I thought I could say "arguments propounded and endorsed by others", since "endorsed" seems to convey the idea that they believe in the conclusions of the arguments. This is the way to avoid the problem referred to by my original question, so my second sentence is related to the first.

    Cheers
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, what you propose does solve the problem of the first version.
    Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments propounded and endorsed by others.
    If it were mine ~ which it isn't ~ I would prefer to add something like:
    Although he expounds several arguments against there being anything good or bad, at the same time he makes it clear that he is merely reporting arguments propounded and endorsed by others.
    There may be a better way, but I would want to be clear that the arguments propounded by others are specifically those against there being anything good or bad.
    _____________________
    If a man begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts. Francis Bacon
     
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