Their group <grew to include> a number of families and individuals

Discussion in 'English Only' started by park sang joon, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. park sang joon Senior Member

    Korean
    In 1846, two brothers named George and Jacob Donner, along with a prosperous businessman named James Reed, organized a party to travel to California. They like many others of the time, hoped to buy land and make a better life for themselves. Their group grew to include a number of families and individuals, reaching a total of eighty-seven people, thirty-nine of them, all of whom set out from Illinois in May of the same year.
    [Source: Reading for Results Ninth Edition by Laraine Flemming]
    I'd like to know to-infinitive "to include" indicates the result of "grew."
    Thank you in advance for your help.
     
  2. bennymix

    bennymix Senior Member

    Ontario, Canada. I grew up in US.
    English (American).
    You could call it 'result'; also one could say that the growth process came to include a number of families, etc. The growth and the inclusion of new persons is really the same thing.

    You might note that there are several possible relations between
    verb + infinitive of another verb,

    in terms of overlapping (which may be total), sequencing (one after the after), etc. Compare "He had gone to answer the door." "His speech turned to babbling." "He seemed to be far away." Compare: "He started to run."
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015

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