<their> top management/<their> average workers

Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, people. Would it be better if I omit the two "their"? Or, it doesn't matter whether I omit or keep them? I understand after omitting "their", "top management is" should be changed to "top managements are".

When businesses create wealth, it is normal that their top management is rewarded greatly financially, whereas their average workers only see a small or even zero rise in their wages.
 
  • duhveer

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Hey, only if you have already referred to a group of people who you are describing in this particular sentence earlier in the paragraph, it would be fine by me if you don't use the possessive determiner "their" and change it to "the": "it is normal that the top management is rewarded greatly *and* financially..." but keep in mind that "their" is a possessive determiner of they, whether talking about singular or plural objects, belongings, etc; the top management is a singular, thus, you shouldn't be adding "are".
     
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    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you, but my question is not whether to use "their" or "the". My question is if it is correct to omit the two "their" and just say "top managements" and "average workers".
     

    duhveer

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thank you, but my question is not whether to use "their" or "the". My question is if it is correct to omit the two "their" and just say "top managements" and "average workers".
    In order to describe specific top management (for example of a specific company) you should add “the” because you are describing a “definite article”.
    Due to omitting the “their” which points the correlation between the workers and their management.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Hi, people. Would it be better if I omit the two "their"? Or, it doesn't matter whether I omit or keep them? I understand after omitting "their", "top management is" should be changed to "top managements are".

    When businesses create wealth, it is normal that their top management is rewarded greatly financially, whereas their average workers only see a small or even zero rise in their wages.
    To me, it's fine to omit 'their' in both cases, or to replace 'their top management' with 'the top management.' There are other problems with the sentence: you don't really need 'greatly'. Also, I'd say (in somewhat formal AmE) 'whereas workers see little or no increase in their wages.' 'Average' is odd; you haven't accounted for the workers who rank above or below the average.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    you don't really need 'greatly'.
    Thank you very much. I'm talking about income inequality. How can I show "inequality" without "greatly"? How about omitting "financially" instead?

    whereas workers see little or no increase in their wages
    "Workers" is all I need? Do I need something like "low-level workers"?

    When businesses create wealth, it is normal that the top management is rewarded greatly financially, whereas workers/low-level workers see little or no increase in their wages.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    How about "When businesses create wealth, the top management normally receives large raises or bonuses, whereas low-level workers see little or no increase in their wages."
    Now that I think about it, since you mention top management (as distinct from middle management), it's probably better to contrast them with low-level workers at the other end of the pay scale.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "When businesses create wealth, the top management normally receives large raises or bonuses, whereas low-level workers see little or no increase in their wages."
    Thank you very much. Is this better than the "their" version? Or they are equally good?

    When businesses create wealth, their top management normally receives large raises or bonuses, whereas their low-level workers see little or no increase in their wages.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Without context, I somewhat prefer 'the top management' and 'workers' with no article.
     
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