...then group A would already be waiting when group B arrived.

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Example:

Initial version: Group A is always informed about Group B's arrival, so Group A always meets Group B.

Transformed version: If Group A were always informed about Group B's arrival, then Group A would always meet Group B.

Please help me do the same to the initial version below:

Initial version: Group A is always informed when group B will arrive, so group A is already waiting when group B arrives.

Transfomed version: If group A were always informed when group B would arrive, then group A would already be waiting when group B arrived.


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Initial version: Group A is always informed when group B will arrive, so group A is already waiting when group B arrives.

    Transfomed version: If group A were always informed about when group B would arrives/is going to arrive, then group A would already be waiting when group B arrivesd.

    I'm not sure what the point of this sentence is.
    Your initial version is ambiguous unless you write told instead of informed (when about is not needed).
     
    Last edited:

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Because informed can be an adjective (meaning in the picture), which is not the same as told.

    I would prefer Group A is always told when Group B is due/going to arrive. I would not write when Group B will:confused: arrive.

    Some context is also needed, e.g. when: does it mean told what time Group B arrives/is due to arrive or told as soon as Group B arrives.?
     
    Last edited:

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Group A is always told when Group B will arrive.

    What is wrong with "will" in this context, doesn't it mean almost the same thing as "is going to arrive"?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You have not given any context.
    Is Group A told after Group B's arrival or before?

    If the meaning is before, you could say Can you tell me when the train will arrive?, although I think it sounds more natural to say is going to or is due to arrive.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If group A were always informed about when group B arrived/was going to arrive, then group A would already be waiting when group B arrived.

    This is a second conditional sentence. Why are the past tense forms in bold wrong?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If the idea is to change Group A is told in advance of Group B's arrival to a when clause, then I would suggest Group A is told when Group B is due/going to arrive.

    The closed conditional would then be:
    If Group A was/were told when Group B was going to arrive, it would already be waiting when the latter arrived.
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If group A were always informed about when group B was going to arrive, then group A would already be waiting when group B arrived.

    If group A were always informed about when group B is going to arrive, then group A would already be waiting when group B arrives.

    Does your sentence with the red present tense forms mean the same thing as the sentence with the red past tense forms?
     
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