'Then / Thus' [conclusion]

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Jomaan

Member
Spanish
Hi all,

I would like to know whether there are differences using 'Then' or 'Thus' in the following constuction:

Fact. Then, Conclusion
Fact. Thus, Conclusion

For example:
You can't speak English. Then, you can't present a program in the BBC
You can't speak English. Thus, you can't present a program in the BBC

Thank you.
PS. Please, feel free to correct my mistakes
 
  • Earth Dragon

    Member
    USA- English
    Hi all,

    I would like to know whether there are differences using 'Then' or 'Thus' in the following constuction:

    Fact. Then, Conclusion
    Fact. Thus, Conclusion

    For example:
    You can't speak English. Then, you can't present a program in the BBC
    You can't speak English. Thus, you can't present a program in the BBC

    Thank you.
    PS. Please, feel free to correct my mistakes
    I would say host instead of "present."

    For the first example I would change "then" to "so" like this.
    You can't speak English. So, you can't host a program on BBC.

    "Then" is usually used with if/then statements like this.
    If you can't speak English, then you can't host a program on BBC.

    For the second example I would say.
    You can't speak English. Thus, you cannot host a program on BBC.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    Earth Dragon makes sense. However, in UK English, it is absolutely fine to 'present' on the BBC - presenters do it all the time. We tend to 'host' less so here in the UK compared to our American cousins, but it's not unheard of.

    However, whether you 'present' or 'host', it would be a programme and not a program (in the UK!).
     

    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It is fine to use "then" in statements of this nature, but it is usually postpositive--that is, it usually follows the first or second word of the sentence:

    "You can't speak English. You cannot, then, host a program on BBC."

    This sounds quite formal to me and I think is generally limited to writing, so I would not suggest it for informal conversation.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    Don't forget the 'therefore' option either, which is a lovely word.

    "You can't speak English. Therefore, you can't present a programme on the BBC."

    Please note, it's 'the BBC' - the definite article is required.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with Earth Dragon and spatula (and also with Starfrown).

    You can't speak English, so you can't present a programme in on the BBC.:tick:
    You can't speak English, therefore you can't present a programme in on the BBC.
    You can't speak English. Therefore, you can't present a programme in on the BBC.:tick:

    (It needs to be programme in BrE unless we're talking about a computer program.)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Moderator note: Please be sure the focus of each post is on the thread topic.
    Small asides are fine, but a complete change of subject is not.

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    _____________________
    I am not so lost in lexicography as to forget that words are the daughters of earth, and that things are the sons of heaven. —Samuel Johnson, Preface to his Dictionary. Happy Anniversary Mrs. and Mr. Loob! —Noah Webster, Preface to his dictionary. :)
     

    Jomaan

    Member
    Spanish
    Thank you very much everyone for your help.

    I would like to summarize the comments.
    Do you think the constructions are from informal to formal writing (or speaking)?

    Using so
    You can't speak English. So you can't present a programme on the BBC.
    You can't speak English, so you can't present a programme on the BBC.

    Using then
    If you can't speak English, then you can't present a programme on the BBC
    You can't speak English. You cannot, then, present a programme on the BBC.


    Using thus
    You can't speak English. Thus, you cannot present a programme on the BBC.
    You can't speak English, thus you cannot present a programme on the BBC. ???

    Using therefore
    You can't speak English, therefore you can't present a programme on the BBC.
    You can't speak English. Therefore, you can't present a programme
    on the BBC.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    Thank you very much everyone for your help.

    I would like to summarize the comments.
    Do you think the constructions are from informal to formal writing (or speaking)?

    Jomaan - my thoughts in green below.

    Using so
    You can't speak English. So you can't present a programme on the BBC. Informal, written.
    You can't speak English, so you can't present a programme on the BBC.
    Informal, speech

    Using then
    If you can't speak English, then you can't present a programme on the BBC
    Informal, speech or written

    You can't speak English. You cannot, then, present a programme on the BBC.
    Formal, written

    Using thus
    You can't speak English. Thus, you cannot present a programme on the BBC.
    Very formal, written
    You can't speak English, thus you cannot present a programme on the BBC. ???
    Very formal, speech or written. Not sure what you're questioning here, all is good!

    Using therefore
    You can't speak English, therefore you can't present a programme on the BBC.
    In my circles, 'therefore' is not so much formal, but just a bit more polite or appropriate on occasion, such as at work. I'd happily use it without it sounding formal, but in other circumstances it would be unnecessarily 'rich'. Good in either speech or written.

    You can't speak English. Therefore, you can't present a programme on the BBC.
    Ditto but the punctuation suggests a written context.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    You're welcome Jomaan, happy to have helped (nb - your explanation has clarified a lot for me).

    I would now be happy to give you the job of presenting a programme on the BBC!
     
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