There are always (two sides to every story Vs the other side of the coin)

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Can "there are always two sides to every story" and "there is always the other side of the coin" be used interchangeably, meaning "you have to always look into the two versions of something that happens - when it involves two people - (crime, argument, etc) because just one version might not give you all the information/facts" ?

An example I created:

What Mike told us about John during the argument they had isn't the whole truth. Remember: there are always two sides to every story Vs there is always the other side of the coin. Let's hear John's version of the facts.

Thank you in advance!
 
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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I can't remember hearing anyone use "There is always the other side of the coin." Where have you seen that?
    I would use "A coin has two sides."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    They don't quite mean the same thing.

    There are two sides to every argument means just that. It doesn't refer to one side or the other, simply to the fact that there are two.

    The other side of the coin refers to the opposite argument. So saying "on the other side of the coin" is similar to "on the other hand".
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you all very much for your answers.

    I can't remember hearing anyone use "There is always the other side of the coin." Where have you seen that?
    I would use "A coin has two sides."
    Could I use "A coin has two sides" interchangeably with "there are always two sides to every story" in the context I provided in my O.P?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. It would certainly be understood. (But I've never come across "a coin has two sides" as an aphorism in its own right.)
     
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