There are no side effects [in using][from using] or [from the use of]?

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High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:


Which is the best choice in terms of correct grammar?

a. There are no side effects in using X

b. There are no side effects from using X

c. There are no side effects from the use of X

Thanks
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Because if it's a side effect, it's not in using x. In the same way that a side road isn't in the main road, it comes from the main road.

    Remember that in English, prepositions are powerful words, they often retain a lot of their original meaning (which is usually a physical relationship: on, in, over, etc.). Don't try to use a preposition that doesn't fit in a physical way to the idea you're trying to express. Does that make sense? Look at the threads on different from/to, and you'll see that some English speakers get quite angry about this!
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Because if it's a side effect, it's not in using x. In the same way that a side road isn't in the main road, it comes from the main road.

    Remember that in English, prepositions are powerful words, they often retain a lot of their original meaning (which is usually a physical relationship: on, in, over, etc.). Don't try to use a preposition that doesn't fit in a physical way to the idea you're trying to express. Does that make sense? Look at the threads on different from/to, and you'll see that some English speakers get quite angry about this!
    :thumbsup: Thanks.
     

    High on grammar

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Because if it's a side effect, it's not in using x. In the same way that a side road isn't in the main road, it comes from the main road.

    Remember that in English, prepositions are powerful words, they often retain a lot of their original meaning (which is usually a physical relationship: on, in, over, etc.). Don't try to use a preposition that doesn't fit in a physical way to the idea you're trying to express. Does that make sense? Look at the threads on different from/to, and you'll see that some English speakers get quite angry about this!
    Sorry to bother you again. But a friend of mine is insisting that " no side effects of using this medication" is more common than " no side effects from the use of this medication.

    " of using" strikes me as unnatural.
    Thanks
     
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