There are two parts in, There are two parts to

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Hello, I am sorry to bother you again...:)

I need to say that a handbook is made of two section and I wanted to say:

"There are two sections in this handbook".

This sounds fine to my Italian ears, but I've sometimes heard on Tv or radio "There are two part to this book", "There are two aspects to this issue". Google does not help because both forms seems to be present.

So, which is the correct sentence "There are two sections in this handbook" or "There are two sections to this handbook"?

Thank you so much!
 
  • It is an introduction for the paper English version of the user's handbook for an ERP software. I wanted to write in as much a colloquial language as possible, something like:

    "There are two sections in this handbook, an user's guide and a technical guide, and there is a live-dvd attached, where you can find the same Demo Company used throughout all the examples given in the book"

    Thank you!
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd say that's fine: "There are two sections in this handbook, an user's guide and a technical guide ...", though I've feeling that "There are two sections to this handbook ... " may be more colloquial.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To my AE ear, "There are two sections in this handbook" without a qualifier, leaves the question open as to whether there are more sections.

    If, however, you say ""There are two sections to this handbook ... " it's definite that the handbook consists of two sections and no more.
     
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