There are usually a lot of parties (on?) New Year's Eve.

Couch Tomato

Senior Member
Russian & Dutch
There are usually a lot of parties (on) New Year's Eve.

Do people really say this without "on" often? According to the key to one of the exercises in English Grammar in Use, it is possible to say this, but it sounds really odd to me. I can accept leaving out "on" before the days of the week. In fact, the author gives a few examples:

I'll see you on Friday.
or I'll see you Friday.

But leaving out "on" before "New Year's Eve" sounds strange to me.

Would you really say that? Which is more common?

Thank you in advance.
 
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  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Yes, I really would. Both with and without on sound fine to me. It doesn't seem to work in all sentences, but it does here. It sometimes works with other holidays, too: "Where are you going Christmas Day?"
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    My suspicion is that American speakers are more likely to say this than I am, because I wouldn't say it and would not expect to hear it said either!
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Not just American speakers, suzi. I'm with Kate on this one: both with and without "on" sound good to me, and I wouldn't hesitate to say "What are you doing New Year's Eve [or Christmas Day]".

    Ws:)
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would say "What are you doing New Year's Eve", referring to the last day of a particular year, but not "There are usually a lot of parties New Year's Eve", referring to the holiday in general.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I would say "What are you doing New Year's Eve", referring to the last day of a particular year, but not "There are usually a lot of parties New Year's Eve", referring to the holiday in general.
    I'm with Forero on this.

    It's similar, for me, to "[on] Friday" etc.

    I could say :tick:"What are you doing Friday?" with reference to this coming Friday.
    But I couldn't say :cross:"There are usually a lot of parties Friday".
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Now I think about it, the same goes for me (as for Loob and Forero) — there does seem to be a distinction between a specific day and the general case. I probably wouldn't say "There are usually a lot of parties New Year's Eve", but I would say (speaking of the upcoming one) "There'll be a lot of parties New Year's Eve" (umm, I think!).

    Ws:)
     

    ribran

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I'm with Forero on this.

    It's similar, for me, to "[on] Friday" etc.

    I could say :tick:"What are you doing Friday?" with reference to this coming Friday.
    But I couldn't say :cross:"There are usually a lot of parties Friday".
    This is just too much for me to handle! Two minutes ago I would have said your first sentence was impossible in BrE. :D

    I agree with both your judgments, Loob. "There are usually a lot of parties New Year's Eve" sounds really strange to me.
     
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