There at the end of the sentence

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germanictamoon

Senior Member
Hindi (West Uttar Pradesh)
Hi all.
In Indian English I often across people forming a sentence with 'there' at the end of the sentence instead of at the starting of sentence. I want to ask if it is common among native speakers also or is it just wrong in American English?

Example:
How do we keep the specimen after preparation? In open?
Answer: No, a pot is there. ( Meaning: we use a pot to keep the specimen).

Raj: I am new in the office. How will I know which file is where?
Ajay: Don't worry. An assistant is there.

Thank you very much.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It certainly sounds very Indian to me, and not at all like everyday English where I live in the UK.
    There is a pot.
    There is an assistant.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Your example answers don't sound very natural - we would more likely say something like 'No, we keep specimens in a pot', and 'Don't worry, there is an assistant who can help you'.

    But that's not to say that we don't sometimes end a sentence with 'there'.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Raj: I am new in the office. How will I know which file is where?
    Ajay: Don't worry. An assistant is there.
    This usage reminds me of "is there for you".
    But it is usually used with definite objects:
    Our maintenance service is there for you.
    That information is there for you if you just look.
    Stop complaining that nobody is there for you when you never want people around.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For the second one, you could say:There is an assistant there.
    The second "there" is "in that place (the office)." If you said "An assistant is there.", I would assume you meant "there in the office", though it sounds a bit odd.
    In the first one, the pot is not in a particular place. When you say "A pot is there.", it sounds odd and I have to ask "Where is 'there'?".
     
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