There is a doctor over there.

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PoisonedQuill

Senior Member
Spain - Spanish
Hallo!

First of all, I know there is already a thread about "es gibt + akkusativ", but it doesn't really answer my question... Sorry if this seems repetitive :eek:

So... the thing is I was translating the sentence...

There is a doctor over there.

...and got this...

Es gibt einen Arzt dort drüben.

...since Arzt is masculine and after "es gibt" comes Akkusativ, so instead of "ein" we get "einen". However, I googled this sentence (only the "es gibt einen Arzt" bit) to see how many results it got vs. "es gibt ein Arzt" (as if it was Nominativ), to check I was right to write "einen". I got the following results:

"es gibt einen Arzt": 1,990 results
"es gibt ein Arzt": 749,000 results

So I've done a little research and everywhere I look I find the same thing: "after 'es gibt' comes Akkusative", which is what I thought and what intuitively seems right to me, but the search results in google are pretty surprising... Can anyone explain this? Is there any case in which that ("es gibt ein Arzt") is correct?

Vielen Dank!
 
  • PoisonedQuill

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Wow, that was fast!

    Thanks so much, Frank78! I was worried that I was getting something wrong. Well, this shows I shouldn't use google results as a guide :D. As you say, it's pretty surprising that so many people get it wrong!

    Danke nochmals!

    EDIT: Und danke, mannibreuckmann!
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    Hallo allerseits :)

    I did the search for "es gibt ein Arzt", with the main observation: There are many incorrect sentences out there on the Internet. :D

    The results, however, also include phrases like "es gibt ein Arzt-Patient-Kommunikationstraining" (which is a correct construction). Moreover, I can't view more than two pages of google results; I'm not able to view any more of these allegedly so many search results (788k or so) :confused:..

    I would probably say: "Dort drüben ist eine Arztpraxis".
     
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    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Google spinnt, die Suche nach "Es gibt ein Arzt" ergibt angeblich 788.000 Treffer, aber bei mir auch nur 2 Seiten, wenn ich auf die 2. klicke steht oben plötzlich nur 14 Treffer.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Google spinnt bei mir in diesem Falle auch.

    Umgangssprachlich wird manchmal das "en" der letzten Silbe weggelassen: "Es gibt ein' Arzt". Schriftsprachlich ist das aber nicht korrekt, sofern man nicht Umgangssprache schreibt oder in Dialogen zitiert.
    Öfter kommt die verkürzte Form "'nen" vor: "es gibt 'nen Arzt". Diese Form ist auch standardsprachlich möglich.

    Die stärkste umgangssprachliche Verkürzung ist: "Es gibt'n Arzt."

    In jedem Fall ist es eine Akkusativform.

    Nicht verwechseln mit:

    Es gibt ein Arzt dir Medizin. (Poetisch für "Ein Arzt gibt dir Medizin.") - Hier ist es Nominativ.
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Google spinnt, die Suche nach "Es gibt ein Arzt" ergibt angeblich 788.000 Treffer, aber bei mir auch nur 2 Seiten, wenn ich auf die 2. klicke steht oben plötzlich nur 14 Treffer.
    Genau. Google Hit-Estimates darf man nicht trauen, bevor man nicht ein wenig weiter geblättert hat!

    Dabai waren einige dieser Hit auch nocht korrekt: "Es gibt ein Arzt-Zentrum...".
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    In this case, I would say: "Es gibt ein Ärztezentrum.."
     
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    Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    Google searches for words individually. Given that 'ein' covers masculine accusative, as well as both neuter nominative and accusative, it would make sense that Google would find more hits for 'ein' than 'einen', though I would think it would be closer to 3 times more rather than ~375 times more... That is indeed a bit ridiculous o_O
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    Google searches for words individually. Given that 'ein' covers masculine accusative, as well as both neuter nominative and accusative, it would make sense that Google would find more hits for 'ein' than 'einen', though I would think it would be closer to 3 times more rather than ~375 times more... That is indeed a bit ridiculous o_O
    Hallo Toadie :)

    since I did the google search with quotation marks, the system searched only for the construction "es gibt ein Arzt". Normally, this way of searching is OK for me, but in this case .. not quite so ;)
     
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    PoisonedQuill

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Puff. Guys, I don't speak much German (I'm just starting), so I don't really understand most of what you're saying here :p. It's ok, though, because my question is already answered, but I just wanted to let you know that if I don't reply to what you're saying it's because I can't :eek:

    Just a couple of replies:

    Ich würde vermutlich sagen: "Dort drüben ist eine Arztpraxis".
    Yes, I'd say it like that as well (although with "ein Arzt" insted of "eine Arztpraxis", because we're talking about a person), but I'm doing Pimsleur's German course and it said indeed "Es gibt einen Arzt" (the recording asks you to say it, you do, and then you hear how you were supposed to say it). The problem is "einen" was pronounced very quickly and I wasn't sure if they were saying "ein" or "einen".
    Thank you for the suggestion!

    Google searches for words individually. Given that 'ein' covers masculine accusative, as well as both neuter nominative and accusative, it would make sense that Google would find more hits for 'ein' than 'einen', though I would think it would be closer to 3 times more rather than ~375 times more... That is indeed a bit ridiculous o_O
    You can group words together by adding quotation marks, which I did. That is, if you search...

    Es gibt einen Arzt

    ...it looks for each word individually and we have the problem you're mentioning. But if you search...

    "Es gibt einen Arzt"

    ...(as I did), it searches for that sentence, that is, all those words together and in that order.
    And an interesting tip, you can use * as a wildcard like this...

    "Es gibt * Arzt"

    ...and then it searches for "es gibt", followed by any number of words, followed by "Arzt". I use this often when I want to see the different alternatives that we can use in place of the *.

    Also, Danke nochmals! Auf Wiedersehen!
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Yes, I'd say it like that as well (although with "ein Arzt" insted of "eine Arztpraxis", because we're talking about a person), but I'm doing Pimsleur's German course and it said indeed "Es gibt einen Arzt" (the recording asks you to say it, you do, and then you hear how you were supposed to say it). The problem is "einen" was pronounced very quickly and I wasn't sure if they were saying "ein" or "einen".
    Thank you for the suggestion!
    Yes, the second E is a schwa-sound. That´s why you have difficulties hearing the difference.
    It may sound like "ein´n" or "einin" or when merged both n´s then "ein" is the result. Of course this is not standard pronounciation.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    In colloquial language there are several shortenings as in English "it is not -> it isn't"

    einen Arzt -> 'nen Arzt, 'n Arzt, ein' Arzt
    The last one is very seldom used in written texts. You must not forget the ' sign.
    I think it is used seldom because it is similar to the nominative. If you omit the ' sign it becomes wrong.

    'nen Arzt -this is used quite often in coll. language.
     
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