There is a lot of disturbance on your end.

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tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
I would like to know about the expressions that we use while experiencing difficulty having a word with someone on the phone.

If I am talking to someone over the phone but there is a lot of disturbance on the line then can I say "there is a lot of disturbance on your end".

"There is a lot of disturbance on the line. It is hard to hear you" or "there is a lot of static on the line". Can we say this, if there is no problem from both ends.
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    You can call it static or interference, not disturbance.
    If it's "on the line", then it isn't "at your end". You should only say "at your end" if you know the problem to be there. This would typically be the case if the interference isn't from static but from people chattering in the background.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    This would typically be the case if the interference isn't from static but from people chattering in the background.
    If this is the case than I can say there is a lot of noise in the back ground at your end.

    Is "on your end" wrong?

    There is a lot of static or interference on the line.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There are many occurrences of "on your end" in this forum. If I remember rightly, all of them were posted by speakers of AmE. I say "at your end" (of the (notional) phone line), just as I say "at the end of the street/week/branch/etc).
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Please don't misquote. The word "signals" does not appear there, nor do the words "caused due to" appear together.

    The best-fitting definition is (n,1) in the Collins list:
    random hissing or crackling or a speckled picture caused by the interference of electrical disturbances in the reception of radio or television transmissions
    Obviously you would need to substitute telephone for radio.
    just as I say "at the end of the street/week/branch/etc"
    ...or "my tether". :)
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Thanks so much, Edinburgher, for correcting me.:)

    You can call it static or interference, not disturbance.
    If it's "on the line", then it isn't "at your end". You should only say "at your end" if you know the problem to be there. This would typically be the case if the interference isn't from static but from people chattering in the background.
    May I please dare to ask what wrong is with the word disturbance if the problem is from the people chattering in the background? Obviously, if people make noise, your voice chat would be disturbed, hence you would call it disturbance causing because of people's noise.:)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    May I please dare to ask what wrong is with the word disturbance if the problem is from the people chattering in the background? Obviously, if people make noise, your voice chat would be disturbed, hence you would call it disturbance causing because of people's noise.:)
    No, it is not really that obvious. If people are talking in the background, it may disrupt the phone call, or drown out the voice of the person I'm trying to hear, or distract me from what is being said. Nonetheless, I wouldn't say "There is a lot of disruption at your end" or "There is a lot of drowning-out at your end" or "There is a lot of distraction at your end," any more than I would say "There is a lot of disturbance at your end."

    I agree with Edinburgher that we would normally refer to "background noise." I would probably say something like "You seem to have a lot of background noise. I can't hear you very well."
     
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