There is a 'so that' sentence in which 'so' can be omitted?

Curiosity777

Senior Member
Korean
As having learned English, I have never seen 'so' is omitted in such a sentence unlike 'that'.

Would you please cite some examples?
 
Last edited:
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Why are you asking, Oiler? Has someone told you it's possible to omit "so"? If that's the case, perhaps that person could give you an example for us to look at:).
     

    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Why are you asking, Oiler? Has someone told you it's possible to omit "so"? If that's the case, perhaps that person could give you an example for us to look at:).
    thank you for replying to my answer.

    The examples.

    I study hard (so) that I enter the college.
    Pack the dresses (so) that they may not crease.
    Let us hurry up, (so) that we may not be too late.
    Do not judge, (so) that you may not be judged.


    Some non-native speakers insist that in these sentences 'so' can be omitted.

    But I am still in doubt.

    Can really it be so?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In older English, it was possible to omit "so", so you'll come across that usage in proverbs, and in quotations from the King James Bible like Judge not, that ye be not judged.

    We don't do that in today's English, though. All your sentences need "so". (I would also use a future tense in all of them, but that's a different issue.)
     

    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    In older English, it was possible to omit "so", so you'll come across that usage in proverbs, and in quotations from the King James Bible like Judge not, that ye be not judged.
    Thank you so much.
    Have a good morning.
     
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