There is/there are

languagestudent5

New Member
English-British
Hi,

I'd love some help knowing how to say 'there is/are' and which case to use with this phrase. My first thought was to use the verb być + instrumental case but the more I think about it the more unsure I am. An example of what I would want to say is e.g. 'In town there is a bakery, a pharmacy and a hairdressers.' I'm also unsure as to this; if you are saying 'there is a bakery, pharmacy etc' would you effectively have to say 'there are' because there is more than one noun?

Many thanks.
 
  • wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    'In town there is a bakery, a pharmacy and a hairdressers.'
    You have to use the verb być + nominative or znajdować się + nominative.
    'In town there is not a bakery, a pharmacy and a hairdressers.'
    You have to use the verb mieć + genitive.


    I'm also unsure as to this; if you are saying 'there is a bakery, pharmacy etc' would you effectively have to say 'there are' because there is more than one noun?
    No. When you give a list of things which exist in a place, you do not have to use a plural form.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    To make a long story even longer: ;)

    - if you have one bakery, you say: "W mieście jest (jedna) piekarnia". The numeral is in parantheses, because it can be omited, depending on context.
    - if there are two bakeries, you say: "W mieście dwie piekarnie"
    - if there is a bakery and two bookstores, you say: "W mieście jest piekarnia i dwie księgarnie".
    - however, if there are two bookstores and a bakery, you say: "W mieście dwie księgarnie i (jedna) piekarnia"

    So no matter how many objects in total are there in the city, the first one after "być" decides on the number: "w mieście jest jedna piekarnia, dwie księgarnie, trzy baseny, dwadzieścia dwa kioski z gazetami i trzy tysiące mieszkańców".

    You have to use the verb być + nominative or znajdować się + nominative.
    Please note that "znajdować się" is not an exact synonym of "być" in this case. It's more formal and simply doesn't match many contexts. So you should understand both, but using only "być" will be quite sufficient most of the cases (unless your language teacher demands both forms, of course :) ).


    'In town there is not a bakery, a pharmacy and a hairdressers.'
    You have to use the verb mieć + genitive.
    To be more precise, a negation of the third person singular of "mieć" + genitive: "W mieście nie ma piekarni". If you want to use a noun in plural, you still use "mieć" in 3rd person singular: "W tym mieście nie ma sklepów".


    Curiosity: In Polish grammar, at least in school teaching, examples similar to the above are used as mnemotechnics helpful in identifying grammatical cases.
    Nominative: kto, co - jest?
    Genitive: kogo, czego - nie ma?

    Of course, this works only with native speakers who instinctively know, which grammatical case should be used to answer which question, and only may have problems with proper case identification.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    It is possible to use the genitive with "być" as well in standard Polish. The meaning, however, changes:
    Było ludzi. -- There were many people.
    So the genitive adds the nuance of multitude. Very often, you will hear "ale" at the front: Ale było ludzi! -- What a great deal of people there was! This is a specific usage, and may well not work in many contexts.

    To muddle the waters even more, the whole thing starts to really complicate when you use numerals:
    W mieście jest jedna piekarnia. -- There is one bakery in the town.
    W mieście są dwie/trzy/cztery piekarnie. -- There are two/three/four bakeries in the town.
    W mieście jest pięć/sześć/.../osiemnaście/dziewiętnaście/dwadzieścia/dwadzieścia jeden piekarni. -- There are five/six/.../eighteen/nineteen/twenty/twenty one bakeries in the city.
    W mieście są dwadzieścia dwie/trzy/cztery piekarnie. -- There are twenty two/three/four bakeries in the city.
    W mieście jest sto jeden piekarni. -- There are a hundred and one bakeries in the city.
    W kraju jest sto/dwieście/tysiąc/milion/sto milionów bezpańskich psów. -- There is/are a hundred/two hundred/thousand/million/a hundred million strayed dogs in the country.
    W kraju jest/są dwa/trzy/cztery tysiące/miliony/miliardy xyz. -- There are two/three/four thousand/million/billion people. (To my experience the singular is of preference).

    I've had a look at the dictionary. There are some rules regarding the usage:
    Podmioty połączone związkiem zgody mają orzeczenie zależne od liczebnika, np. Jeden senator protestował; Dwie biegaczki trenowały, natomiast podmioty tworzące związki rządu orzeczenie w lp, które w formach czasu przeszłego i trybu warunkowego ma rodzaj nijaki, np. Pięciu wiolonczelistów wróciło z konkursu z nagrodami. Por. hasła alfabetyczne jeden, dwa, trzy, cztery.
    [...]
    Składnia liczebników wielowyrazowych zależy prawie bezwyjątkowo od wymagań gramatycznych ostatniego elementu; tylko w liczebnikach zakończonych na jeden o formie rzeczownika oraz orzeczenia przesądza przedostatni składnik, np. Siedemdziesiąt trzy studentki wyjechały na praktykę zagraniczną (jak trzy studentki); Osiemdziesiąt dziewięć kobiet wymagało hospitalizacji (jak dziewięć kobiet); Czterystu jedenastu interesantów obsłużył bank tamtej środy (jak jedenastu interesantów); Pięćdziesięciu jeden harcerzy zdobyło odznaki sprawnościowe (jak pięćdziesięciu harcerzy).
    Formy męskoosobowe dwaj, trzej, czterej nie mogą być składnikami liczebników złożonych; w tej funkcji używane są wyłącznie formy dwóch, trzech, czterech, np. Zgłosiło się trzydziestu dwóch doborowych tancerzy (nie: *Zgłosili się trzydziestu dwaj doborowych tancerzy; nie: *Zgłosili się trzydzieści dwaj doborowi tancerze).
    Wyrazy tysiąc, milion, miliard w liczebnikach wielowyrazowych przyjmują takie formy gramatyczne jak rzeczowniki, np. dwa tysiące, pięć tysięcy, siedem milionów. Nawet w połączeniu z liczebnikami dwa, trzy, cztery cały liczebnik może się łączyć z orzeczeniem tak jak liczebniki powyżej pięciu, np. Dwa tysiące zakładników zginęło w tym obozie.
    Nowy słownik poprawnej polszczyzny PWN © Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN SA

    This is just a part of them. This is what the usage looks like. This is quite mind-boggling.
     
    Last edited:

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    A foreigner tries to buy different kinds of beer in a small grocery shop in Poland:
    Poproszę jedno piwo marki Lech.
    Dwa piwa marki Heineken.
    Pięć piw marki Żywiec.

    Then he can say:
    Na ladzie jest jedno piwo marki Lech.
    Na ladzie są dwa piwa marki Heineken.
    Na ladzie jest pięć piw marki Żywiec.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Było ludzi. -- There were many people.
    This is so "ultra colloquial". It sounds like "was music" in English.
    In ordinary Polish there must be a qualifier, for instance "Było wielu ludzi", but even this sounds amputated, it is much better to say "Było tam wielu ludzi".

    Podmioty połączone związkiem zgody mają orzeczenie zależne od liczebnika, np. Jeden senator protestował; Dwie biegaczki trenowały, natomiast podmioty tworzące związki rządu orzeczenie w lp, które w formach czasu przeszłego i trybu warunkowego ma rodzaj nijaki, np. Pięciu wiolonczelistów wróciło z konkursu z nagrodami. Por. hasła alfabetyczne jeden, dwa, trzy, cztery.
    [...]​

    Could you explain what the bolded text means? This sentence is so complicated and it is incomplete too. There is no predicate referring to the subject "podmioty tworzące związki ..."

     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    To muddle the waters even more, the whole thing starts to really complicate when you use numerals:
    W mieście jest jedna piekarnia. -- There is one bakery in the town.
    W mieście są dwie/trzy/cztery piekarnie. -- There are two/three/four bakeries in the town.
    W mieście jest pięć/sześć/.../osiemnaście/dziewiętnaście/dwadzieścia/dwadzieścia jeden piekarni. -- There are five/six/.../eighteen/nineteen/twenty/twenty one bakeries in the city.
    W mieście są dwadzieścia dwie/trzy/cztery piekarnie. -- There are twenty two/three/four bakeries in the city.
    W mieście jest sto jeden piekarni. -- There are a hundred and one bakeries in the city.
    W kraju jest sto/dwieście/tysiąc/milion/sto milionów bezpańskich psów. -- There is/are a hundred/two hundred/thousand/million/a hundred million strayed dogs in the country.
    From the thread creator's perspective - apparently a foreigner learning Polish - there are two important pieces of information in the above to be taken care of:

    1) depending on the numeral, verbs can be used in singular or plural number (which relates to the original question). Thank you Thomas1 for pointing it out, I completely missed this point focusing on the sentence structure only.

    2) nouns with numerals in plural are used in various cases depending on the numeral (which does not relate to the original question, yet it has to be taken into consideration).

    In both cases the magic numbers are 2, 3 and 4. Numerals ending with these digits (except for ending with 'teens' 12, 13, 14) need plural verb and a noun in plural nominative. Other numerals need singular verb and a noun in plural genitive. I hope I didn't miss anything this time. ;)

    Some people claim that Polish is one of the most difficult languages in the world, perhaps this is one of the reasons. ;)
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Some people claim that Polish is one of the most difficult languages in the world, perhaps this is one of the reasons. ;)
    This system is to be found in almost all Slavic languages, with some variation. The Russian one is at least as complicated as Polish, maybe even more.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    This is so "ultra colloquial". It sounds like "was music" in English.
    In ordinary Polish there must be a qualifier, for instance "Było wielu ludzi", but even this sounds amputated, it is much better to say "Było tam wielu ludzi".
    Yes, that's right. This particular example is rather informal. The adverbial of place has to be either implicit or explicit. Would the form "wielu" in "Było wielu ludzi." be your first choice?
    Could you explain what the bolded text means? This sentence is so complicated and it is incomplete too. There is no predicate referring to the subject "podmioty tworzące związki ..."

    Podmioty połączone związkiem zgody mają orzeczenie zależne od liczebnika, np. Jeden senator protestował; Dwie biegaczki trenowały, natomiast podmioty tworzące związki rządu [mają] orzeczenie w lp, które w formach czasu przeszłego i trybu warunkowego ma rodzaj nijaki, np. Pięciu wiolonczelistów wróciło z konkursu z nagrodami. Por. hasła alfabetyczne jeden, dwa, trzy, cztery.
    jeden senator -- podmiot, grupa liczebnikowa złożona z liczebnika i rzeczownika w związku zgody, liczba pojedyncza
    protestował. -- orzeczenie, czasownik nieprzechodni, liczba pojedyncza, czas przeszły dla rodzaju męskiego

    pięciu wiolonczelistów -- podmiot, grupa liczebnikowa złożona z liczebnika i rzeczownika w związku rządu, liczba mnoga
    wróciło -- orzeczenie, czasownik nieprzechodni, liczba pojedyncza, czas przeszły dla rodzaju nijakiego
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top