There live wild anymals.

  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Did you read this somewhere PantherK, or did you invent it yourself?

    My answer is that it depends what you want it to mean. We need context. The grammar is correct but the word-order is archaic. When would you use this statement?

    Here is an example context

    Parent: Would you like to go to the zoo?
    Young child: What is a zoo?
    Parent: It is a kind of park. Wild animals live there.


    Is that what you mean?
     

    PantherK

    Member
    Russian
    Yes, you can.


    Yes, you can. The word order is somewhat unusual, but it is certainly possible to use the adverb there at the beginning of the sentence.
    Thank you! Oh, yes, of course animals.

    How else could I build this sentence, except for "The wild animals live there"? - would this be the most correct one? I want to say that "There live wild animals in the wild nature".
     

    PantherK

    Member
    Russian
    Did you read this somewhere PantherK, or did you invent it yourself?

    My answer is that it depends what you want it to mean. We need context. The grammar is correct but the word-order is archaic. When would you use this statement?

    Here is an example context

    Parent: Would you like to go to the zoo?
    Young child: What is a zoo?
    Parent: It is a kind of park. Wild animals live there.


    Is that what you mean?
    Thank you! Yes, it is somewhat my own sentence, I gave the example how I wanted to use it above:)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "The wild animals live there"? - would this be the most correct one?
    Yes. This is the most common and natural word order to use in the sentence.

    I want to say that "There live wild animals in the wild nature".
    This seems fairly strange. I expect to read something like this: Wild animals live in natural environments/natural areas.

    People sometimes use there at the beginning of sentence that continues with the verb be: There is a cat on the porch. = A cat is on the porch. But it is uncommon to use a verb like live in this pattern. If you do so, readers or listeners will probably assume that you are trying to write in a poetic or deliberately archaic way.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Here and there are very often used at the beginning of clauses, but most often with the verbs be, come, go and modals. "Be" and its variants are the only verbs that appear in the top ten words following here or there. They add emphasis:

    Here is my house; there's my brother in the garden.
    Here comes the bride!
    There went my chances of a Nobel Prize!


    Followed by live, it's most unusual.
     

    PantherK

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much, everyone, for explanation! Especially that there is/there are we use mainly with the verb be, and some other verbs like come, go and modals! Now I know, that there live animals in the forest would very strange way to say! :)
     

    PantherK

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you very much, everyone, for explanation! Especially that there is/there are we use mainly with the verb be, and some other verbs like come, go and modals! Now I know, that there live animals in the forest would very strange way to say! :)
    BTW, is the word order in this sentence fine?: Especially that there is/there are we use mainly with the verb be.
     
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