There will be her who <comes> <will come> for him.

Peter Thompson

Senior Member
Malaysian
Hi. I have a pair of sentences :
1. There will be her who comes for him
2. There will be her who will come for him

Is either of those sentences incorrect ?
If both are correct, what's the difference ?

Many Thanks!
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, the second part of both sentences is OK.

    But the first part isn't: There will be her:cross:

    cross-posted
     

    Peter Thompson

    Senior Member
    Malaysian
    Neither sentence is correct.
    How would I make it correct ?

    Where did you get them from?
    A movie

    Well, the second part of both sentences is OK.

    But the first part isn't: There will be her:cross:
    But why do native speakers say "There will be her who comes for him" ? For what reason do they use this structure ?
    And would you tell me why "there will be her" is incorrect in that context ?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    Where (and when) did the movie take place? In the modern US? In the modern UK?

    Or in a fictional medieval land, where the people speak "fictional English, sort of like old-fashioned English"?

    they usually talk naturally in movies.
    They only talk naturally in movies that take place in modern times.

    If a movie takes place in 1920 Chicago, they use 1920 American English (not modern).

    If a movie takes place in 1500s Europe or ancient Rome, they don't speak modern English.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And perhaps you could give us the name of the film and tell us more about the character. Was s/he a non-native speaker of English?
     

    Peter Thompson

    Senior Member
    Malaysian
    Where (and when) did the movie take place? In the modern US? In the modern UK?

    Or in a fictional medieval land, where the people speak "fictional English, sort of like old-fashioned English"?
    Actually it's from a movie that belongs to Marvel.
    She says it in the movie Doctor Strange In The Multiverse of Madness.
    The dialogue :
    Wanda : Take her there before 6PM
    Stephen : What If I don't ?
    Wanda : There will be Scarlett Witch who comes for her.

    And perhaps you could give us the name of the film and tell us more about the character. Was s/he a non-native speaker of English?
    Elizabeth Olsen is the actor. She's English
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Google tells me that the sentence was actually:
    Then it won't be Wanda who comes for her, it will be the Scarlet Witch.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Will acts as the time reference for the sentence (or question), denoting the future. You only need to do that once, not twice.

    Who will come for her?
    {The person who comes for her} (noun phrase) will not be Wanda.
    It won’t be Wanda who comes for her.
    The person who will come for her is Wanda.
     

    Peter Thompson

    Senior Member
    Malaysian
    Will acts as the time reference for the sentence (or question), denoting the future. You only need to do that once, not twice.

    Who will come for her?
    {The person who comes for her} (noun phrase) will not be Wanda.
    It won’t be Wanda who comes for her.
    The person who will come for her is Wanda.
    Thanks for making this clear!

    <New question removed by moderator (Florentia52)>
     
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