there would never have been any unpleasantness except for what happened in the garden.

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shiness

Senior Member
Korean, South Korea.
"What of it? What of it?" cried Svidrigailov, laughing openly. "But this is what the French call bonne guerre, and the most innocent form of deception! . . . But still you have interrupted me; one way or another, I repeat again: there would never have been any unpleasantness except for what happened in the garden.


Hello.

The Quote is from the novel "Crime and Punishment" and I'd like to get my understanding of the phrase in blue checked and confirmed by your assurance.

Could "there would never have been any unpleasantness except for what happened in the garden" be interpreted as "there would never have been any unpleasantness if nothing had happened in the garden" ? or, "there would never have been any unpleasantness were it not for what happened in the garden".


In summary, I'm using two options of my own;
1. if nothing had happened
2. were it not for.
 
  • MissFit

    Senior Member
    Yes, I think you have it right. Both of your re-worded sentences convey the same meaning as the original--the second one is best, I think.

    It appears to me that the garden that is mentioned is the garden of Eden mentioned in the Bible and it means that if Adam and Eve had not committed the original sin, that there would never have been any unpleasantness in the world throughout history.
     
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