therefor

< Previous | Next >

Charles12

Member
Chinese
While working on Chinese-English translation for the Law Firm's written exam, I find the following translation and am uncertain about whether the word "therefor" therein is used correctly.

Where a shareholder requests to consult the accounting books of the company, a written request shall be submitted to the company, stating the purpose thereof. Where the company, for any justifiable reason, considers that the shareholder’s request for consultation of the accounting books is made for any improper purpose and may impair the legitimate interests of the company, the company may decline the shareholder’s request and shall, within 15 days as of the date on which the shareholder submits the written request, issue the shareholder with a written reply, stating the reasons therefor. (Context: Company Law of the People s Republic of China)

I think the word "therefor" is equivalent to the phrase "for that thing", and since "decline" appear in the sentence in the verb form rather than in the noun form, "the reasons therefor" could be apprehended as either "the reasons for the written request" or "the reasons for the written reply". Thus, the second sentence in the paragraph, though grammatically acceptable, is flawed in the meaning that it tries to express if it originally attempts to convey the message of "the reasons for declination". Is my reasoning for considering it an incorrect sentence sound and justified?

Thank you for your intention.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can’t really follow your misunderstanding of it. But it’s all fine.

    At the beginnig of the text, the purpose thereof means the shareholder’s purpose in making the request.
    At the end, the reasons therefor means the company’s reasons for declining that request.
     

    Charles12

    Member
    Chinese
    I can’t really follow your misunderstanding of it. But it’s all fine.

    At the beginnig of the text, the purpose thereof means the shareholder’s purpose in making the request.
    At the end, the reasons therefor means the company’s reasons for declining that request.
    But the word "decline" here is used as a verb and I think it is not a match for the thing that the word "therefor" indicates, which should be a noun. Or is it just me being too rigid and inflexible about grammar rules and "therefor" could also refer to an action?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Therefor means for that. In your sentence, it means 'for declining the request' (as lingobingo has said). The object of for is the whole clause ('the company may decline the shareholder’s request'), not just the verb. The use is fine for a document written in that style.
     

    Charles12

    Member
    Chinese
    Therefor means for that. In your sentence, it means 'for declining the request' (as lingobingo has said). The object of for is the whole clause ('the company may decline the shareholder’s request'), not just the verb. The use is fine for a document written in that style.
    Thank you.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does this make it any clearer?

    … the company may decline the shareholder’s request and [in such event] shall … issue the shareholder with a written reply, stating the reasons therefor (= for doing so / for declining the request).
     

    Charles12

    Member
    Chinese
    Does this make it any clearer?

    … the company may decline the shareholder’s request and [in such event] shall … issue the shareholder with a written reply, stating the reasons therefor (= for doing so / for declining the request).
    It's very kind of you to offer further explanation.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top