There's no place like Rome

helenacasey

Member
english
I'm trying to translate a newspaper headline - There's no place like Rome.

Can I substitute Rome in the french phrase Rien ne vaut son chez-soi, to say Rome ne vaut son chez-soi to replicate the word play, or does it mean nothing to a native French speaker?
 
  • JeanDeSponde

    Senior Member
    France, Français
    I would say Rome est comme nulle autre, Rome est une ville unique, Nulle par ailleurs qu'à Rome, A Rome et pas ailleurs...
    But I suspect there is something else in your sentence, given the translation you suggested. Is the narrator a Rome-dweller?
    Then something along Dans ma Rome et pas ailleurs ?
     

    helenacasey

    Member
    english
    Thanks for replies. I should have given more context. The article is about the violence at the football match in Rome v Man U recently. The full UK title is No place like Rome for eternal troubles - so it's essentially a negative spin on Rome - calling it a trouble spot for football violence as opposed to the UK where the stadiums are better stewarded/controlled. Have thought of perhaps using the proverb 'When in Rome' to try "Conflits eternelles : Au stade de Rome, il faut suivre le modele anglais" (A Rome, il faut vivre comme les romains). Might that pun come across in French?
     

    JeanDeSponde

    Senior Member
    France, Français
    For those still wondering, the English headline is a play on "There's no place like home"
    Indeed I was rightly suspecting - but not in the right direction... Sorry!
    Que penseraient les francophones de :
    Rome, l'unique objet de mon sentiment ?

    (N.B. for UK : "Rome, l'unique objet de mon ressentiment" is a quote from Corneille's "Horace")

    PS. I just read Helene's post about the negative spin - I'm afraid my suggestion would then not fit. Maybe keep "ressentiment"? Perhaps too litterary, anyway.
     

    helenacasey

    Member
    english
    Thanks for all suggestions - I like the Corneille quote, but ressentiment might be too strong. I think I will use Rome sweet Rome if the French readers would be familiar with that - I often see English words in newspaper headlines. Merci a tous!
     
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