'There's no rush'

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frooty_bazooty

New Member
Ireland born, living in Paris, english native speaker
The context is that my 65 year old female boss was reassuring me that she was going to give me something and I wanted to reply 'There's no rush'.

I said 'Il n'y a pas une hâte' and I don't think it made sense because she didnt understand what I meant.

I saw that you can say 'Rien ne presse' but I got the feeling this is a bit casual and need something very formal as she is quite proper and conservative. Thanks
 
  • Chèvredansante

    Senior Member
    English
    Je vous conseille : « Ça ne presse pas. »

    « Rien ne presse » is to me literary and I would never write it to a professor or a boss. It sounds snobby to say. Only a 65 year old with a bourgeois accent may say it to me, or I would faire un caca nerveux pour l'emploi de langage snooty.

    Vous pourriez également employer une expression telle que : « Ce n'est pas important. » But that even poses problems as the subjet matter may be important but not impendingly so.


    Il y a aussi : « Lorsque vous aurez le temps, ».
     

    frooty_bazooty

    New Member
    Ireland born, living in Paris, english native speaker
    This is really useful, thank you all

    Can I just confirm if 'Il n'y a pas une hâte' makes sense or not?
     

    Franglais1969

    Senior Member
    English English, français rouillé
    this cannot be used. If you relly want to use "hâte" or "hâter" you could say :
    "faîtes le sans hâte", or "pas besoin de vous hâter", but it is not very common
    Lezert, please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe faites-le should have a hyphen.
     
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