there's or just is.

ShadeWee

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone :)

Can you guys explain to me the difference between these two:

- the cup of tea is on the table
- there's the cup of tea on the table
 
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    No, I don't mean that. You could say 'There's the cup of tea on the table' in a specific context talking about a specific cup of tea. Your sentence however has no context and it therefore sounds odd with the definite article.

    I suggest you check the many, many threads that talk about the use of articles in English.:)
     

    ShadeWee

    Senior Member
    Russian
    No, I don't mean that. You could say 'There's the cup of tea on the table' in a specific context talking about a specific cup of tea. Your sentence however has no context and it therefore sounds odd with the definite article.

    I suggest you check the many, many threads that talk about the use of articles in English.:)
    That would presumptuously to say that I know how to use the articles, but I only wanted to know the difference between that sentences in their specific state.

    That's not a good example of context, but it's enough to get the main sense I guess:
    My friend comes to my home. I say: I will pour you a cup of tea, wait in another room. After a poured him a cup of tea, I go to the room he's in, and say to him :

    - there's the cup of tea in the kitchen.
    - the cup of tea is in the kitchen.

    What does each of them imply? This situation is unlikely, strange, or even incomprehensible, I know :). I just want you to know what I want :)
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's the cup of tea in the kitchen. This wouldn't work in this context.
    The cup of tea is in the kitchen. This means that the specific cup of tea you mentioned earlier is in the kitchen.

    There's a cup of tea in the kitchen. This means that there is an unspecified cup of tea in the kitchen, to which he is welcome.

    (Of course, if you were a true friend, you'd take the tea into the other room him. With a biscuit or two. ;))
     

    ShadeWee

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There's the cup of tea in the kitchen. This wouldn't work in this context.
    The cup of tea is in the kitchen. This means that the specific cup of tea you mentioned earlier is in the kitchen.

    There's a cup of tea in the kitchen. This means that there is an unspecified cup of tea in the kitchen, to which he is welcome.

    (Of course, if you were a true friend, you'd take the tea into the other room him. With a biscuit or two. ;))
    Would you mind to give (to come up with) an example of context where saying "there's the" would work?. I promise I will get out and stop annoying you all as soon as I understand where I can use this :rolleyes:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You seem to insist on using "There's the ..." for some reason. Please tell us whether the "there" in the expression you want to use means

    location (adv. in or at that place (opposed to here):)

    or

    simple existence ( pronoun: (used in place of a subject, and followed by the verb be and some other verbs to indicate that something exists):
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In which case it simply indicates the location of the X, if necessary accompanied by a pointing action to clarify the location.
    There is the X. = There's the X (optionally followed by more description etc).
    There's the book I was looking for.
    There's the tallest mountain on earth.
     

    ShadeWee

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I'm sorry, but it's not completely clear to me. Thanks you all for your help and that you spend your time on me, but I'm not sure about some things:

    You say: There's the Belfast. Doesn't this sentence carry the sense of existence? And "the" is used because there's no more Belfasts. There's the only one city, called "Belfast". I also don't understand the sense of "There's the book I was looking for". Doesn't it take the sense of existence either? By saying it, I mean that the book I was looking for just exists. Right?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I'm sorry, but it's not completely clear to me. Thanks you all for your help and that you spend your time on me, but I'm not sure about some things:

    You say: There's the Belfast. Doesn't this sentence carry the sense of existence? And "the" is used because there's no more Belfasts. There's the only one city, called "Belfast". I also don't understand the sense of "There's the book I was looking for". Doesn't it take the sense of existence either? By saying it, I mean that the book I was looking for just exists. Right?:cross::cross::cross:
    There is can be used for either location or existence - it depends on the context and the desired meaning. You asked in post #9 for examples of location. That is what we gave you. The Belfast is a ship.

    I pointed with my finger and said to him "There is the book I was looking for." Location.
    There is a book about plate tectonics that I wish to buy. It exists - no location is implied.
    I pointed with my finger and said to him "Oooh, look , there's a box of chocolates that I want to buy". Location.
     

    ShadeWee

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There is can be used for either location or existence - it depends on the context and the desired meaning. You asked in post #9 for examples of location. That is what we gave you. The Belfast is a ship.

    I pointed with my finger and said to him "There is the book I was looking for." Location.
    There is a book about plate tectonics that I wish to buy. It exists - no location is implied.
    I pointed with my finger and said to him "Oooh, look , there's a box of chocolates that I want to buy". Location.

    Alright. Let's imagine a situation where somebody I talk to and me went away a little, and I can't point the book with my finger because we are a bit far from the book (what's more, we are out of the shop). And I say: Do you remember about that book? That I was looking for ? There's the book in this shop. // Can I say this?

    But what will be the difference if I say: "The (That) book is in this shop" in that situation?
    And what will be the difference if I say: The book I was looking for is there (pointing with a finger being in the shop).

    My question was only about the difference between saying "the book is on the table", and "there's THE book on the table", and I guess I have knowledge of using this expression with "a" article. That's easy.
    I think I know how to use "there's the" when I say that something particular exists (There's the truth that they can't see) I'm talking about the existence of a particular thing. But when when it's time to say something about location:

    There's the pen on the table (I borrowed somebody's pen, and when they come to me, I say that their pen is on the table. Go ahead and take it)
    I don't know what's the difference between the one above and this: The pen is on the table.

    I know that would be more politely If I'd deign to give them the pen on my own, but it doesn't matter :p

    Thanks for answering, and I'm sorry for bothering.
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    But when when it's time to say something about location:
    There's the pen on the table (I borrowed somebody's pen, and when they come to me, I say that their pen is on the table. Go ahead and take it)
    I don't know what's the difference between the one above and this: The pen is on the table.
    Since you give a location for the pen, the need to use there to indicate its location is eliminated. So we just wouldn't say "There's the pen on the table". It would just sound non-native. We might well say "There's the pen, on the table" where "on the table" is additional information after a pause, indicated by the comma.
     

    ShadeWee

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Since you give a location for the pen, the need to use there to indicate its location is eliminated. So we just wouldn't say "There's the pen on the table". It would just sound non-native. We might well say "There's the pen, on the table" where "on the table" is additional information after a pause, indicated by the comma.
    that seems to be the thing I needed. Thank you :)
     
    Top