These porridge >a single bowl of the stuff.

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
This thread http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1466905, to make a porridge of something, has sensitized me to the glop, which I still enjoy on cold winter days, but with the AE names oatmeal and sometimes hot cereal.

Here I confess to eccentric reading habits, which yesterday included the biography of
James Murray, the first editor of the OED (Oxford English Dictionary). His granddaughter reports that he fussed at the cook:

James was fussy about his porridge, and would look critically at it, breaking into his Scotch dialect to exclaim: 'These porridge are waesh [liquid]', or 'These porridge are brose [thick]'. *

"These porridge" caught my eye, and I am wondering if "they" are so described in any other variant of English.


*Caught in the Web of Words, James Murray and the Oxford English Dictionary
K.M. Elisabeth Murray, Yale University Press, 1977
 
  • pauloliebre

    Senior Member
    British English
    As you say, it appears in Scotland, where they seem to pluralise certain food?

    "In early use, and in modern Scots and English regional use, frequently construed as plural." (OED)


    "They're fine, halesome food they're grand food, parritch. " (R.L.Stevenson)
    "They're good parritch eneugh". (Scott)

    The OED has an early example of it in the plural ("1550 T. LEVER Serm. (Arb.) 122 Hauyng a fewe porage made of the brothe of the same byefe, wyth salte and otemell.)

    Oh, and in Jayne Eyre, "there is a woman wants me to give her these porridge." "Well lass," replied a voice within, "give it her if she's a beggar.
     
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    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Many thanks, pauloliebre. May your porridge always be warm. :)



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