They found

claude23

Banned
FRANCE
Good morning,


At work : they found someone to take over from me straight after I left . Is it correct ? Is "straight"ok in this sentence ?

To propose a toast and make a toast . Are they both correct ?

Thank you,

CLaude.
 
  • texasweed

    Banned
    French-born/US English
    "straight" is ok, but not "to take over from me"

    They found someone to replace me right after I left
    I'd offer a toast, IMO
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    texasweed said:
    "straight" is ok, but not "to take over from me"

    They found someone to replace me right after I left

    Your sentence is fine, texasweed, but I don't understand your objection to the expression "to take over from someone". It's perfectly good English.
     

    morgoth2604

    Senior Member
    Israel - (Fluent Hebrew and English), Passable French, Horrid German
    claude23 said:
    Good morning,


    At work : they found someone to take over from me straight after I left . Is it correct ? Is "straight"ok in this sentence ? Straight is ok, but I would use "right", it's...I don't know, it sounds better :). And I would say someone to take over <for> me.

    To propose a toast and make a toast . Are they both correct ?
    They're both correct.
    Thank you,

    CLaude.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    For me, there's a subtle difference between "take over from someone" and "take over for someone".

    The first sounds as if the person is a permanent replacement for your role in a company, whereas the second implies that they are perhaps only taking on responsibility temporarily, for a particular task.

    For example, a cashier at a supermarket might say to a colleague: "Will you take over for me here? I haven't had my lunch break yet."
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I have a small problem with the story so far, sorry:eek:

    In my head, take over from me includes a very strong sense of direct handover from me to someone else.
    It is not possible for someone to take over from me after I have left. They may find someone to take over my role, or to take over my responsibilities, or to take on my job. But this person will not be able to take over from me unless I am there for at least a momentary handover.

    I expect this is no help at all. I think Claude really wants to use "straight after". Unfortunately, that is too late to "take over from" anyone. That would have to be "when I left", not after - not even straight after.

    To add further unhelpful comment, I wouldn't say straight after, I would say immediately after.

    Incidentally (struggling for a positive note), I agree with E-J's subtle distinction between take over from, and take over for.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    claude23 said:
    At work : they found someone to take over from me straight after I left .


    To propose a toast and make a toast . Are they both correct ?

    I would suggest: they found someone to take over for me straight away (which has a lofty british feel to it)

    or: they found someone to take over for me immeidately

    Note that I'm not finding actual ERROR, just suggesting alternate, potentially cleaner language.

    Most americans would "propose a toast". My european friends often say "let's make a toast". Its cute. It's charming. But I always suspect its part of their accent (ie in Portuguese they customarily use fazer). Just usage. Again, neither is technically incorrect.

    In fact, non-standard but understandable language is often (but not always) perceived as colorful, and prized by native english listeners as special (or at least entertaining and fun in a good way). Unless its some cliche part of a common accent that's been well played out.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    claude23 said:
    Good morning,


    At work : they found someone to take over from me straight after I left . Is it correct ? Is "straight"ok in this sentence ?

    To propose a toast and make a toast . Are they both correct ?

    Thank you,

    CLaude.

    I would say "propose a toast".

    "make a toast" sounds more like putting a slice of bread in the toaster.
     
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