they got blasé about the US and EU

epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
In the last 10 years, the Jones (an American family with two kids) would travel to different states in the US and different countries in Western Europe. Please confirm if you would say any of the following in this situation:

They got blasé about the States and Europe that they decided to have an Asian tour next year.​
They got tired of traveling around the US and western Europe that they decided to have an Asian tour next year.​
On the other hand, the Smiths never got blasé because they went to different countries in five different continents. In other words, they never went back to the same destination.​
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I'd use bored with rather than blasé about myself, but it's not wrong.
    (Do you mean the Joneses? I don't know many families with the last name Jone.)
     
    Last edited:

    Ikwik64

    Senior Member
    British English, originally Australian
    They got blasé about the States and Europe that they decided to have an Asian tour next year.
    They got tired of traveling around the US and western Europe that they decided to have an Asian tour next year.
    The grammar is wrong. It should be:
    "They got so blasé [...] that they decided..."
    "They got blasé [...] and decided..."
    "They got blasé [...], so they decided..."

    To me, blasé in English suggests "unconcerned", "not bothered", more than "tired" or "bored".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    To me, blasé in English suggests "unconcerned", "not bothered", more than "tired" or "bored".
    Yes, I'd say that's not an appropriate use of blasé.

    If you are blasé about something you hardly notice it's presence consciously. If you work as an explosives expert, a very loud explosion close by is something you might become blasé about, whereas for a regular person it might be a very unnerving experience.
     
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