They got wedded.

< Previous | Next >
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    There should be some context, because that might change our comments.
    I don't think 'they got wedded' is correct at all! "Got wed" might be, except it's not often used unless perhaps in some regions. I seem to recall it being used in my homeland, the far North East. "Time you were wed, lad!"
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    These days 'wedded' is largely only an adjective ('wedded bliss'; 'I'm not wedded to the idea'), but the Ngram Viewer shows them pretty equal, and clicking into Books shows a lot of old uses of the verb 'wedded' as both a simple past and past participle.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    A lot of the older examples seem to be from sources that are not using AE or BE.

    Indian English seems to have been fond of it, and perhaps still is?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The "got wedded" phrase brought up pages (via links shown beneath the graph) of examples with "(name) and (name) got wedded", as well as "they got wedded".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I was a wedding photographer for many years and in the hundreds of weddings I photographed I never once heard "got wedded" (I did hear "espoused", which seemed weird enough).

    Almost universally it is "join in holy matrimony" during the ceremony.

    Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to join this man and this woman in holy matrimony.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top