they never pitched such glorious drunks back home

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serhatuygur

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello, can somebody please explain to me what "pitched" means in the sentence below. I couldn't find any suitable meaning for it in the dictionaries. Thank you.

Webster described the result in an October 23 diary entry: “Although I do not enjoy the army, most of the men in this outfit find
it a vacation. Boys who had been working steadily at home enter the army and are relieved of all responsibilities. It is unanimously agreed
that they never pitched such glorious drunks back home.”

Source: Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello. It seems to be a variation of "throw", serhatuygur. I've heard of people "pitching a fit", but "pitching a drunk" sounds odd to me here in the twenty-first century. Both "throw" and "pitch" have a figurative meaning in remarks like this. They imply that the act of being drunk or having a fit require some effort on the part of whoever is "throwing/pitching a drunk or a fit."
     

    serhatuygur

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hello. It seems to be a variation of "throw", serhatuygur. I've heard of people "pitching a fit", but "pitching a drunk" sounds odd to me here in the twenty-first century. Both "throw" and "pitch" have a figurative meaning in remarks like this. They imply that the act of being drunk or having a fit require some effort on the part of whoever is "throwing/pitching a drunk or a fit."
    Thank you very much for your answer Owlman. So basing upon your explanation, it possible to say that the sentence means that, they had never got drunk so easily/without effort back home as they did in the army?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That's right. Ambrose and his fellow soldiers were having fun and getting drunk together in a way that none of them had experienced back home.
     
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