They say one month's salary

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Agito a42

Senior Member
A piece of dialogue from Deadpool, the movie.

Wade asks Vanessa to marry him and offers her a toy ring:
Vanessa: Where were you hiding that?
Wade: Nowhere. (pause) They say one month's salary.
Vanessa: You mean?
Wade: I do.

Does Wade mean that the ring costs his one month's salary? Sounds a little absurd.
 
  • I gather it's an engagement ring and there are guidelines for 1 (or 2 or 3) month(s) of the man's salary. Yes, diamonds cost that easily.

    See, for example, De Beers myth: Do people spend a month's salary on a diamond engagement ring? - BBC News

    Those in the diamond-selling business prefer to recommend higher numbers!

    ADDED: If the ring is worthless, it could be that his mention of one month is asking her to consider it an engagement ring. And she apparently assents.
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    When he says "they say" he refers to a common guideline: that an engagement ring should cost one month's salary.

    I cannot explain what Wade "means" here by mentioning that (if the ring is worthless, as you suggest). But Vanessa seems to understand.

    cross-posted
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    So Wade implies that a decent man spends his month's salary on an engagement ring to offer it to his beloved, and now he hereby do the very same thing (except the fact that the ring is a mere toy), am I correct?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    What you write doesn't make sense: him claiming a toy ring is one month's salary.

    He may be implying that he will spend one month's salary to buy her a real ring later. Or he may be implying something else.

    Remember, this is fiction, text written by a writer. It might make no sense at all. Or it might make sense to the writer, but he forgot to add the other sentences, with information that will let us understand.

    He may not want to interrupt the "tender romantic moment" by having the character explain. So he leaves it unexplained, and we are confused.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    Sorry, dojibear. I think I just didn't put it properly... Anyway, I guess I get the idea, it's just something that cannot be easily rendered into my own language, and I would have trouble explaining it.

    So, the thing is, thank you for your help :).
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    See above:
    ADDED: If the ring is worthless, it could be that his mention of one month is asking her to consider it an engagement ring. And she apparently assents.
    I think benny has it exactly correct. They have a rather playful relationship, but even in that context, he needs to reassure her that it's intended to be an engagement ring, because normal people wouldn't offer their potential fiancée a ring pop (it's a sucker shaped like a ring) that has been carried around in someone's ass. (It's a double joke, because he's also commenting on the fact that he doesn't make much money - he beats people up for cash.)
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    Yes, bennymix, I had read your addition. You're absolutely right, the link you provided is also very helpful. Like I said, I got the idea. It's just the phrase itself. It has too many implications and too many things left out. Probably, the most unusual thing to me is that there's no verb at all, just "one month's salary." But now I see it's not a problem.

    PS: pob14, thank you for providing the extra details ;).
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Well, if his "profession" is mugger, and he doesn't have a salary, then one month's salary is not going to be very much. So he can only afford a toy ring, and he probably didn't even pay for it, but stole it.
     
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