They stayed abreast of each other's readings

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susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi there,

In Romanian "readings" can mean "books one reads," among other things (the action of reading, psychic readings, interpretations). In English it rarely means that. How can I rephrase "They stayed abreast of each other's readings" so that I don't use the word "readings" but still keep "each other's"?

Thank you!
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Can you give us some context for "They stayed abreast of each other's readings", please, susanna?
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    The idea is of two people who keep in touch and update each other regularly on their "readings." Is it OK to use "readings" like that?
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Do you mean they shared reading lists with each other? Did they just know what the other was reading or did they read the same things?
    Exactly. They shared reading lists with each other / knew what the other was reading.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    So this is something you're writing, susanna, rather than something you've read?
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Readings in the plural is most likely to be taken as meaning the advice (reading their fortune) given each of them by their psychic reader-advisers.

    If you want it to mean "what they were reading", you have to say "what they were reading".
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Yes, it's something I'm trying to express in English, and I don't really know how. It works in Romanian and Spanish, but not in English. And I became puzzled by it, wondering if I can avoid the more verbose "what they were reading."
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We sometimes refer to what we read as reading (My reading has been quite wide-ranging this year) but the word is uncountable so it is never readings in this sense.

    Moreover, the word reading has many other senses too, for example relating to how well one reads (Little Johnny's reading has improved this year), so the context has to make it abundantly clear what sense is meant.
     
    Last edited:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's hard to think of something which doesn't sound "literary", susanna. I think I'd say "Each of them kept in touch with what the other was reading".
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Yeah, there doesn't seem to be an easy way to say this. Someone in the Spanish-English forum suggested I say "exchanged opinions about what they were reading" even though I didn't refer explicitly to this aspect of the communication, so I think I'll go with that.
    se16teddy: Yes, I see what you're saying. It's a good point.
    Thank you all!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I agree with teddy. BBC Radio 4 has a book programme called, "Open Book". There is a section called "Reading Clinic" - this does not concern reading ability but the type of book to be read i.e., as susanna describes, "reading matter".
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    We sometimes refer to what we read as reading (My reading has been quite wide-ranging this year) but the word is uncountable so it is never readings in this sense.

    Moreover, the word reading has many other senses too, for example relating to how well one reads (Little Johnny's reading has improved this year), so the context has to make it abundantly clear what sense is meant.
    Is "reading" uncountable? I do see someone with "s" added. I was confused by its single and plural form. Would you give me some advice?
     
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