they went for me

shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Dear all,


This is quoted from an interview about facial mask-packaging on Youtube.
Dave: I did. I'll be honest I noticed the difference.
Dave's friend: Really?
Dave: Yeah. Several women just threw themselves at me, just on the way back from washing my face.
Dave's friend: But Dave, that happens anyway.
Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me.

In this context, what does 'they went for me' mean?


Thank you for your help.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Shorty. Dave sounds like a popular guy.

    If they "went for him", they were probably squealing and trying to touch him. This sounds like ordinary behavior if Dave is some kind of star.

    It might also mean that these girls were aggressively asking him for dates or something like that.

    I suspect that this whole dialog is fictional. Who knows? Dave himself might have written the script. :)
     
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    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hi, Shorty. Dave sounds like a popular guy.

    If they "went for him", they were probably squealing and trying to touch him. This sounds like ordinary behavior if Dave is some kind of star.

    Thank you very much, owlman.

    Judging from your answer, he must be bluffing in a joking manner.

    I get it.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hi, Shorty. Dave sounds like a popular guy.

    If they "went for him", they were probably squealing and trying to touch him. This sounds like ordinary behavior if Dave is some kind of star.

    It might also mean that these girls were aggressively asking him for dates or something like that.

    I suspect that this whole dialog is fictional. Who knows? Dave himself might have written the script. :)

    Yes. You're right. Just so you know, they in fact didn't do the interview seriously.
    And I heard normal men in western hardly use skin care products like celebrities and gays.
    I think they just wanted to make people laugh.
    Thanks for your time. :)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me.

    In this context, what does 'they went for me' mean?
    to go for somebody = to launch an attack (usually, focussed and with violent intent) upon someone, e.g. "He climbed onto the wall and jumped into the garden. That is when the dogs went for him."
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    to go for somebody = to launch an attack (usually, focussed and with violent intent) upon someone, e.g. "He climbed onto the wall and jumped into the garden. That is when the dogs went for him."
    Thank you, Paul.
    I thought it meant after he used a mask-pack, women flirted with him more agressively than usual.
    I can't associate the context with the meaning.
    Could you explain a bit more?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You will see
    Dave: Yeah. Several women just threw themselves at me, = Dave: Yeah. Several women just were enthusiastically offering themselves to me,

    this is now increased in intensity to

    Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me. = Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they launched an attack on me [with the intention of having me].
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You will see
    Dave: Yeah. Several women just threw themselves at me, = Dave: Yeah. Several women just were enthusiastically offering themselves to me,

    this is now increased in intensity to

    Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me. = Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they launched an attack on me [with the intention of having me].
    On second thoughts, maybe "they felt more tenacious as if they went for me(=they launched an attack on me)." is a little more natural than "they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me."

    Am I wrong?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, you are wrong. :eek: Dave is inventing this story, so as to be humorous. (The whole thing did not happen but it would be amazing if it had happened.)
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Yes, you are wrong. :eek: Dave is inventing this story, so as to be humorous. (The whole thing did not happen but it would be amazing if it had happened.)
    Could you confirm one more thing, Paul?
    The internet Webster dictionary defines "in the way that" as "as".
    So "they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me." is the same as "they felt more tenacious as they went for me.", right?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No, wrong.


    Please read what I have written. We are not concentrating on "... but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me."

    In the definition that you have found, as (= in the way that = in the manner that) is not the best word to use for this context. As is used to mean "in the way that" but it is not a common use: "He ate his food in the way that wolves do." = "He ate his food as wolves do." = "He ate his food in the manner that wolves do."

    "... but they felt more tenacious in the manner/way that they went for me." :tick: in the manner/way that describes the style of the attack
    "... but they felt more tenacious as they went for me." :cross: Here, people would understand as = when, but it does not, so we do not use as, otherwise it would be confusing.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    No, wrong.


    Please read what I have written. We are not concentrating on "... but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me."

    In the definition that you have found, as (= in the way that = in the manner that) is not the best word to use for this context. As is used to mean "in the way that" but it is not a common use: "He ate his food in the way that wolves do." = "He ate his food as wolves do." = "He ate his food in the manner that wolves do."

    "... but they felt more tenacious in the manner/way that they went for me." :tick: in the manner/way that describes the style of the attack
    "... but they felt more tenacious as they went for me." :cross: Here, people would understand as = when, but it does not, so we do not use as, otherwise it would be confusing.

    Thank you very much, Paul.

    I interpret "he ate his food in the way that wolves do." as "the manner that he ate his food is the same as the manner that wolves do."

    So, do I have to interpret "they felt more tenacious in the manner/way that they went for me." as "the manner that they felt more tenacious is the same as the manner that they went for me."? :confused: -> I don't understand this.

    In my view, I find "they felt more tenacious as if(or as though) they went for me." more natural than the original sentence.

    I don't know exactly why I think so. :eek:
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think I see your problem: there are four parts of the sentence that are either like idioms or have a less common meaning:

    they felt = it seemed to me that they were -> this is the same intransitive use of the verb "to feel" that we find in "I felt unhappy." It does not concern the sense of touch, it describes the emotional experience.
    tenacious
    = This has the figurative meaning, determined; motivated, not the literal meaning of "holding on tightly."
    in the way that = in the manner/style in which: it does not mean "as" in the sense of "when" (We have discussed this)
    they went for me = they started their attack on me. (We have discussed this)

    Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me. -> Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but it seemed to me that they were more determined/motivated in the manner in which they started to attack me.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I think I see your problem: there are four parts of the sentence that are either like idioms or have a less common meaning:

    they felt = it seemed to me that they were -> this is the same intransitive use of the verb "to feel" that we find in "I felt unhappy." It does not concern the sense of touch, it describes the emotional experience.
    tenacious
    = This has the figurative meaning, determined; motivated, not the literal meaning of "holding on tightly."
    in the way that = in the manner/style in which: it does not mean "as" in the sense of "when" (We have discussed this)
    they went for me = they started their attack on me. (We have discussed this)

    Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but they felt more tenacious in the way that they went for me. -> Dave: Yeah, that happens normally, but it seemed to me that they were more determined/motivated in the manner in which they started to attack me.

    I'm very impressed by the way you interpret the construction "feel+adjective".
    And the explanation for the word "tenacious" is so helpful, too.
    Since you elaborated on that, now I've understood it clearly.

    Thank you very much, Paul and all. :)
     
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