thick accent

Dymn

Senior Member
What would you call a "thick accent" in your language? One that is generally difficult to understand because it's very different from the standard or the one you're familiar with.

In Catalan and Spanish we say "closed accent":

Catalan: accent tancat
Spanish: acento cerrado
 
  • merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    French:
    Avoir un fort accent
    Avoir un accent à couper au couteau


    In English it's also possible to say:
    Have a strong accent
    Have a heavy accent
     
    Last edited:

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek it's either «βαριά» [va.ɾiˈa] (fem.) --> heavy, or «τραχιά» [traˈça] (fem.) --> coarse, crude, harsh.

    -MoGr adj. «βαρύς, -ιά, -ύ» [vaˈɾis] (masc.), [va.ɾiˈa] (fem.), [vaˈɾi] (neut.) --> heavy, grievous < Classical adj. «βαρύς, -εῖα, -ρύ» bărús (masc.), băreî̯a (fem.), bărú (neut.) --> heavy, low, deep, grievous (PIE *gʷrh₂-u- heavy cf Skt. गुरु (gurú), heavy, Proto-Germanic *kuruz > Go. kaurus, heavy).

    -MoGr adj. «τραχύς, -χιά, -χύ» [traˈçis] (masc.), [traˈça] (fem.), [traˈçi] (neut.) --> coarse, crude, harsh < Classical adj. «τραχύς, -χεῖα, -χύ» trākʰús (masc.), trākʰeî̯a (fem.), trākʰú (neut.) --> rough, uneven, stony, bumpy, severe, harsh (PIE *dʰrh₂-gʰ-u- rough cf Proto-Slavic *dražiti, to irritate, annoy > Rus. раздражить (idem), BCS дражити/dražiti (idem)).
     

    KalAlbè

    Senior Member
    American English & Kreyòl Ayisyen
    In Brazilian Portuguese it's pretty common to say a lot of accent for a heavy accent.
    E.g. Ele tem muito sotaque. Lit. He has a lot of/much accent
    I've also heard sotaque carregado which literally means a charged or loaded accent, which I guess would be closer to heavy accent in English.

    There might be other ways, though, so wait for native speakers.
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    I should point out, now that I think of it, that acento cerrado is not really an equivalent of thick accent in English. In English, you'd call a thick accent any accent that differs too much from the standard, be it native or non-native. In Spanish I really wouldn't say to a Russian who's learning the language that they have an acento cerrado. It's only reserved for natives, often with an implication of understanding difficulties and, quite often, backwardness or "closed-mindedness" (that's the cerrado part I think). Funny thing is, when applied to regional languages it's often applied to some genuine dialects which are the most divergent from Spanish (in Catalan especially for Girona and Balearic Islands), while heavy Spanish-influenced phonetics from some people in Barcelona are never called that way.

    You could also say fuerte acento in Spanish, in that sense you could apply it to non-natives as well. But I don't think of it as idiomatic at all.
     

    In-Su

    Senior Member
    Fr. French
    In Brazilian Portuguese it's pretty common to say a lot of accent for a heavy accent.
    E.g. Ele tem muito sotaque. Lit. He has a lot of/much accent
    Conversely, in French we say that someone with a very light or imperceptible foreign accent n'a pas d'accent (has no accent).
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek it's either «βαριά» [va.ɾiˈa] (fem.) --> heavy, or «τραχιά» [traˈça] (fem.) --> coarse, crude, harsh.

    -MoGr adj. «βαρύς, -ιά, -ύ» [vaˈɾis] (masc.), [va.ɾiˈa] (fem.), [vaˈɾi] (neut.) --> heavy, grievous < Classical adj. «βαρύς, -εῖα, -ρύ» bărús (masc.), băreî̯a (fem.), bărú (neut.) --> heavy, low, deep, grievous (PIE *gʷrh₂-u- heavy cf Skt. गुरु (gurú), heavy, Proto-Germanic *kuruz > Go. kaurus, heavy).

    -MoGr adj. «τραχύς, -χιά, -χύ» [traˈçis] (masc.), [traˈça] (fem.), [traˈçi] (neut.) --> coarse, crude, harsh < Classical adj. «τραχύς, -χεῖα, -χύ» trākʰús (masc.), trākʰeî̯a (fem.), trākʰú (neut.) --> rough, uneven, stony, bumpy, severe, harsh (PIE *dʰrh₂-gʰ-u- rough cf Proto-Slavic *dražiti, to irritate, annoy > Rus. раздражить (idem), BCS дражити/dražiti (idem)).
    Apologies for quoting myself, just wanted to add that pronunciation is «προφορά» [prɔ.fɔˈɾa] (feminine, hence the feminine gender of the adjectives) < v. «προφέρω» [prɔˈfe.ɾɔ] --> to pronounce < Classical v. «προφέρω» prŏpʰérō --> lit. to bring before or to one, present, proclaim, later cite, propose, conduce < preposition & prefix «πρό» pró + v. «φέρω» pʰérō.
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    Conversely, in French we say that someone with a very light or imperceptible foreign accent n'a pas d'accent (has no accent).
    A native with a thick regional accent (mostly from Southern France) may be described by his fellows as quelqu'un qui a l'accent ("who has the accent", as if there were only one true accent). The connotation may be positive... or derisive, depending on context.
    Somebody sounding foreign a un accent (note the indefinite article).
     
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