things had gotten to the point

corta12

Senior Member
Japanese
I never planned on telling my boss about my struggles with mental illness, mostly because I was afraid of losing my job. But things had gotten to the point where I couldn’t hide it anymore.

The reason why(that?) "had gotten" is in the past perfect is the story is in the past and still relevant. Is that correct?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Corta: why are you still confused about the past perfect? You've now asked many, many questions about it...
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Can you explain why you're still struggling? You've now had quite a few answers from native English speakers - and they've all said the same thing:)
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I never planned on telling my boss about my struggles with mental illness, mostly because I was afraid of losing my job. But things had gotten to the point where I couldn’t hide it anymore.
    back then (at that point in the past), by then (previous to that point in the past)

    But things had gotten to the point where I couldn’t hide it anymore. Before that point in the past it was already too much to bear.
    But things were at the point where I couldn’t hide it anymore. At that point in the past it was too much to bear.
    But things are at the point where I can't hide it anymore. Now it is too much to bear.

    Why does the author want to express the idea that it was already (by that time) too much to bear, (and not then (suddenly) too much to bear, and not now (suddenly) too much to bear? We don't know. It's the author's choice. The author wants to say that, before that time in the past, it was already a problem.

    before that time in the past ==> past perfect
     

    id1brok

    New Member
    English - England
    As an Englishman, I would never use 'had gotten'; the term seems to be peculiar to American English. However, in the context, that is irrelevant.
    "My problem had developed to the point where I could not hide it." I would suggest is more precise. "Things" could mean anything.
    On to the subject.
    'Stewart caught the six am train.'
    'Jane dialled Stewart's number at seven fifteen."
    Both sentences past simple tense.
    We can make use of past perfect to join the two sentences.
    "Jane dialled Stewart's home number at seven fifteen but he had left earlier."
    We use the past perfect (had left) because the action happened before another action in the past, (Stewart left before Jane dialled).
    In your own example: The increase in the mental problem happened before it became impossible to hide.
    By the way, Corta 12, I feel it is impossible to be 'stupid' when you are trying to learn or to improve; we all stumble occasionally over the minutiae of grammar. As Hercule Poirot would say, "We need to exercise the little grey cells".
     
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