Things military groove.

AlexanderIII

Senior Member
Russian

Hi!
Could you please help me in the difficulty with a phrase from the film
"Welcome to the 80's". Its text consists of the quotations taken from the interviews with rock musicians. Probably there is some general idea in the quotations but no context to speak of.

One of the commentator's cues starts from the phrase:

Things military groove. On stage: the evening news made danceable, and Maggie Thatcher on the corpus of a guitar. Press conferences from all over the world are turned into rhythms.

It refers to the song "Sluggin' Fer Jesus" by the band Cabaret Voltaire.
1. Do they mean that the band exploits the military theme? I cannot surely say what is on the screen at the time, but it looks like some fragments from the TV news, policemens' or militarymens' backs are depicted.
2. Is it possible that 'is' is omitted in the phrase "Maggie Thatcher on the corpus of a guitar"? That's the only way I can interpret these words.




 
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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    groove as a verb colloquially means to be enjoyable, stimulating, in touch with a popular sense, etc.

    If you click on the above link, you will find a listing to previous threads where that sense is threshed out.
     

    AlexanderIII

    Senior Member
    Russian
    groove as a verb colloquially means to be enjoyable, stimulating, in touch with a popular sense, etc.

    If you click on the above link, you will find a listing to previous threads where that sense is threshed out.
    I've looked through the posts of forum discussions devoted to the "groove" but still I need help in interpreting "things military groove".
    I can see several variants of interpretation but all of them seem unlikely.
    1) Just things linked to military problems (subject-matter).
    2) [They devote much attention to] military theme.
    3) They find pleasure in military subject-matter.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    3) They find pleasure in military subject-matter.
    I'd say this is the closest, Alex. Things military groove = 'Military stuff is cool/fun/hip/groovy/funky/hep ...' [insert obsolete slang word for 'good' of your choice:D]. I imagine (knowing what I know of Cabaret Voltaire) that the statement is meant to be deliberately provocative: that they find inspiration in military-style stuff.

    The part the evening news made danceable, and Maggie Thatcher on the corpus of a guitar is just two items in a list of two, hence the omission of finite verbs. (I've no idea what the corpus of a guitar means, mind you.)

    P.S. Was it the word order that was baffling you? Here's a thread about 'things + adjective' as opposed to 'adjective + things'.
     
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    AlexanderIII

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I've no idea what the corpus of a guitar means, mind you.
    [/I]
    In the video Meggy's image (most probably taken from the screen of the black-white TV-set appears on the corpus of an acoustic guitar. So that's clear. And "the evening news made danceable" means that the content of the news is communicated by means of dance, does it not?
    And yes, it is partly the word order that puzzles me. I've looked through the thread you kindly gave in your post. Now this part is also clear.
     
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