think up/invent/come up with

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
Their teacher is very creative. She thinks up/invents/comes up with interesting activities for every class.


It seems to me that all the three terms work here and make no difference in meaning. correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Ah, I see you're still on the "come up with something" topic :D

    I'm not vrey happy with the use of "think up" in this context, but I can't tell you why. Just doesn't sound right. So I could be wrong.

    She "invents" would be understood, but I'm still not very pleased with it.

    She "comes up with" interesting activities sounds perfect.

    EDIT: I feel like Goldilocks, tasting a bit of papa bear's and mama bear's porridge, before I get to the one that's just fine :)
     

    idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "She comes up with.." means she has good ideas, but they are not necessary originally her ideas. Maybe she saw the activities at another school and thought it would be fun to use them with her own class.

    "She invents..:" means that she has really developed the ideas for these activities on her own.

    "She thinks up..." is somewhere in between the other two. It tends to imply that the ideas are her own, but is not as specific in that regard as "invents."
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Ah, I see you're still on the "come up with something" topic :D

    I'm not vey happy with the use of "think up" in this context, but I can't tell you why. Just doesn't sound right. So I could be wrong.

    She "invents" would be understood, but I'm still not very pleased with it.

    She "comes up with" interesting activities sounds perfect.

    EDIT: I feel like Goldilocks, tasting a bit of papa bear's and mama bear's porridge, before I get to the one that's just fine :)

    Agreed.

    --She invents........(sounds like she's a scientist:rolleyes:)
    --She thinks up......(never heard of it:eek:)
    --She comes up with......(simply perfect:thumbsup:)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thanks Nichec, for sticking up for me :D

    Actually, I performed a search and "to think up" is, apparently, quite common (I wonder what planet we're living on... Earth to Nichec and Trisia...!).

    If you don't trust me, see it yourself :D

    Still, they mention that it's used especially when you invent/create/make up excuses (lies ;))
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Thanks Nichec, for sticking up for me :D

    Actually, I performed a search and "to think up" is, apparently, quite common (I wonder what planet we're living on... Earth to Nichec and Trisia...!).

    If you don't trust me, see it yourself :D

    Still, they mention that it's used especially when you invent/create/make up excuses (lies ;))

    So, what should I say?.....

    --I can think up 1000 reasons why panj prefers me?:eek::D

    Seriously, it still doesn't work in this context, right? (the original sentence)

    And thanks, partner, you teach me something new today:):thumbsup:
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I think it sounds ok if you say "I can think up a list of reasons why Panj prefers cats".

    [Glad to serve, I learn from you everyday]
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I think it sounds ok if you say "I can think up a list of reasons why Panj prefers cats".

    [Glad to serve, I learn from you everyday]

    Hmmm.....Is "a list of " better here? why? Can't I use 1000?:confused:
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    As a matter of fact, I think they both work. I just like mine better, because it involves cats. :D

    I honestly don't know why I thought a noun (a list) would sound better than a numeral. It just did.
     
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