thinking (with) motions/sounds?

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Renatrix

Senior Member
polski
I'm translating an article in which the author describes Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons). Is it correct to say that someone thinks with motions (when he or she has bodily-kinesthetic intelligence) or with sounds (when he or she has musical intelligence)? Or maybe 'to think motions' and 'to think sounds'?
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I haven't the faintest idea what you're/he's talking about, Renatrix. Perhaps you could give a bit more detail for those of us who've never even heard of 'multiple intelligences'.
     

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    I must translate what the author of the article says, not H. Gardner. And she doesn't change his ideas, but phrases them in a different way.
    When I say "to think with sounds" or "to think sounds," I want to say that a person thinks (uses his/her mind) using (through) sounds, i.e. understands things best if they are presented through sounds, music, etc.
    When I say "to think with motions" or "to think motions," I want to say that a person thinks (uses his/her mind) using (through) motions/movements, i.e. understands things best if they are presented through movement.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The preposition you are looking for is almost certainly "in". Some of us think in words, some think in sounds, some think in images, some think in more abstract concepts.
     
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